A sportswear company blasts the government shutdown in a full-page ad calling for Trump to 'Make America's Parks Open Again'

national park service shutdownAndrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

Columbia Sportswear wants President Donald Trump to "Make America's Parks Open Again."

On Friday, the outdoors clothing and gear company ran an ad in The Washington Post calling for an end to the government shutdown and not-so-subtly slamming Trump's immigration policies.

"Walls shouldn't block access to parks, and federal workers shouldn't be left out in the cold," reads a quote from Columbia CEO Tim Boyle. "Work together to open the parks."

Columbia spent $80,000 for the full-page ad, reports The Oregonian. It says in large letters: "Make America's Parks Open Again."

Here is what the ad looks like:

make america's parks openColumbia Sportswear

Columbia did not respond to Business Insider's request for further comment on the ad.

National parks in the American West have been plagued by garbage and feces overflow in recent weeks, absent of workers to clean toilets or pick up trash.

Park rangers and other federal employees working in parks have been furloughed for three weeks as the government shutdown stretches into day 21. However, despite the lack of federal employees to maintain the parks, the Trump administration has opted to keep the gates open to the public during the shutdown.

"The filth is unprecedented, even for a shutdown, when it's common for the government to suspend all operations at national parks - including visitor access," reports Insider's Aria Bendix.

Read more: Disturbing photos show national parks and monuments overflowing with garbage as the US government shutdown continues

Boyle has spoken out against Trump's policies before.

"I think it's just a travesty what's happening," Boyle said of Trump's immigration policies in June 2018. "I think it's just to the detriment of the country."

Columbia isn't the only outdoors brand to get political in recent years. Patagonia and REI slammed Trump after a December 2017 announcement that two national monuments were set to be drastically reduced in size.

"Clearly, the outdoors is a huge part of our business," Boyle told The Oregonian.

"Parks in the U.S. are where people use our products. Parks are being damaged by people doing things they probably wouldn't do if management were in place"

Exclusive FREE Slide Deck: Future of Retail:AI by Business Insider Intelligence

{{}}
Subscribe to whatsappSubscribe to whatsapp
Add Comment()
Comments ()
X
Sort By:
Be the first one to comment.
We have sent you a verification email. This comment will be published once verification is done.