Diwali isn’t just a ‘Hindu’ festival — Here are 5 lesser known reasons behind the celebration of India’s festival of lights

Read full story

  • Diwali has always denoted the victory of the Hindu deity, Ram over the demon, Ravana but there are many reasons why people across India celebrate diwali.
  • In fact, the various reasons to celebrate Diwali don’t just vary from region to region, but also from religion to religion.
  • From goddess Lakshmi’s birthday to laying down the foundation of the Golden Temple, people have many reasons to celebrate Diwali.
The Indian festival of lights, Diwali, is considered to be an ‘Hindu’ festival, where people practising Hinduism celebrate the return of Hindu deity, Rama after killing the demon Ravana based on the Hindu epic, Ramayana.

At least, this is what most people across the world have come to identify with the festival of Diwali over the years..

But Diwali is a lot more than that. There are more historical and mythological reasons to celebrate the great Indian festival. Reflecting the unity in diversity nature of Indian culture, all these prominent reasons have one thing in common — the triumph of good over evil.

Let’s find out why people across Indian cherish Diwali so much
{{}}

View As: One Page Slides

Krishna rescued 16,000 girls by killing a demon

Krishna rescued 16,000 girls by killing a demon

(Facebook/@Narkasur2017)

South Indian people enjoy the festivities a day before North India does since they have a different reason to celebrate.

Just one day prior to Diwali, Lord Krishna beheaded a demon named Narakaasur and freed 16,000 girls who were under his captivity. In fact, even South India has different version of this story giving them more reasons to celebrate the same day over and over again.

​The founder of modern Jainism attained nirvana

​The founder of modern Jainism attained nirvana

(wikimedia.org)

People who believe in Jainism have a quieter way of enjoying Diwali. They actually restrict themselves from using fireworks, which is in stark contrast to the way the rest of India celebrates the occasion.

For them Diwali is when the founder of modern Jainism, Mahavir Tirthankar, reached ‘nirvana’ -- the highest state of enlightenment that someone can can attain.

Sikh celebrate ‘Prisoner Release Day’

Sikh celebrate ‘Prisoner Release Day’

(sikhrelief.org)

Sikh people celebrate ‘Bandi Chorr Divas’ which means ‘Prisoner release day’ on the same day as Diwali. The Sikh community pays tribute to their Sixth Guru, Guru Hargobind Sahib, who was released from Mughal prison in 1619.The amalgamation of Diwali and Prisoner Release Day is a call for celebration throughout the Punjab region.

​End and beginning of a new harvest season

​End and beginning of a new harvest season

(wikimedia.org)

The significance of Diwali can also be attributed to agriculture. In some parts of India, it’s when the harvest season in ending whereas in other parts, such as Gujarat, its when the new crops are being harvested marking the beginning of a new season for farmers and traders.

​New year in Hinduism

​New year in Hinduism

(wikimedia.org)

Indian people celebrate New Year’s eve on Diwali as per the Hindu calendar. Most Hindu businessmen worship Goddess of Wealth, Lakshmi, and treat the day as the beginning of a new financial year. They even mark the point in their account books and clear off old debts, where they start afresh.

In fact, according to the Hindu calendar, we are currently living in the year 2075.

Add Comment()

Comments ()

X
Sort By:
Be the first one to comment.
We have sent you a verification email. This comment will be published once verification is done.