Goldman Sachs job cuts - How to pitch VCs - Walmart's trucking ambitions

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Finance and Investing

Goldman Sachs is cutting about 5% of sales and trading staff after senior equities leaders delivered a tough town-hall talk

Goldman Sachs is cutting roughly 5% of its sales and trading staff as its new CEO, David Solomon, conducts a review of the business and looks for ways to improve collaboration between the divisions.

Related: A top Goldman Sachs sales trader is leaving to take a big role at JPMorgan

JPMorgan and Citigroup just closed bond desks for smaller trades in favor of algorithms. It's another sign that robots are taking over.

Some of Wall Street's biggest corporate bond dealers are replacing humans with algorithms for a portion of their trades, another sign the robot revolution is in full swing.

Investors are starting to freak out about the amount of their activity being monitored and monetized by investment banks

Investors need to be more careful than ever about how they click, talk, and type. Investment banks are watching.

Here's why the proposed breakup of big tech is giving some experts painful flashbacks to the financial crisis

With big tech squarely in the government crosshairs, some on Wall Street think that years of pain are coming for social-media companies like Facebook and other longtime market favorites like Google.

Tech, Media, Telecoms

Apple's App Store fees are coming under increasing pressure from Spotify, Netflix, and regulators. Cutting them could lower its earnings by 10% next year.

Spotify's complaint against Apple over unfair competition could end up costing the iPhone-maker billions of dollars.

The first-time founder's ultimate guide to pitching a VC

Just because you've binge-watched "Shark Tank" doesn't mean you know what it takes to deliver a successful pitch to investors.

Google has told dozens of employees in its laptop and tablet division to find new jobs at the company, raising questions about its hardware plans

Google has moved dozens of employees out of its laptop and tablet division and is scaling back the size of its in-house hardware group as it reassesses product plans in the fiercely competitive computer market.

AT&T has a streaming choice problem that has the industry guessing about its long-term strategy

AT&T has a choice problem.

Healthcare, Retail, Transportation

Regulators are cracking down on vaping, but that might actually be good news for the standout e-cig maker Juul

Federal regulators announced bold plans to curb the sale of sweet and fruity varieties of e-cigarettes, such as those offered by Juul, on Wednesday.

Walmart US is increasingly relying on its 8,600 'Elite Fleet' truckers over third-parties - and it's the latest move from America's largest company to take charge of its transportation network

Last year, when a truck driver shortage hit industries across the board, retailers ranging from Amazon to General Mills to Tyson Foods had to reevaluate their bottom lines.

Meet the pharmacy quietly powering hot startups like Hims and Nurx that ship Viagra and birth-control pills straight to your door

Seemingly overnight, a crop of companies have sprung up that can prescribe and mail you medications like birth control and Viagra.

Leaked email reveals Elon Musk must approve all new Tesla hires

All hires made by Tesla must receive CEO Elon Musk's approval, according to an email sent to Tesla recruiting employees in February.

Exclusive FREE Report: The Self-Driving Car Race by Business Insider Intelligence

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