The chaos over two defence deals may derail India's budget session of Parliament

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The chaos over two defence deals may derail India's budget session of Parliament
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Indians can expect a chaotic budget session of Parliament as both the government and the opposition are ready with fresh ammunition to accuse each other of corruption.

The government auditor-- the Comptroller and Auditor General of India-- is reportedly ready to table its report on the controversial deal to procure 36 Rafale aircraft from France. While the opposition parties were waiting to grasp an opportunity to tarnish the Narendra Modi government’s image, the latter has managed to turn the tables.

News agencies reported late on Wednesday that government investigators have managed to bring back key accused in older scandals, still under investigation, that would corner the opposition Congress back into the defensive.

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Rajiv Saxena, the co-accused in the ₹3600 crore AgustaWestland helicopter deal, has been extradited to India from United Arab Emirates (UAE) on Wednesday, news agency ANI reported.

Media reports also claimed corporate lobbyist Deepak Talwar, an accused of money laundering, has also been extradited. Both are expected to reach India tonight (January 30).

Both Saxena and Talwar are accused of receiving kickbacks and laundering money to enable corrupt deals, including those in the defence sector, during the regime led by Congress, preceding the current administration under Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

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On the other hand, the incumbent government is battling charges of corruption in an airline deal of its own, the decision to buy Rafale aircraft from French company Dassault. The price for 36 aircraft purchased by the Modi government in 2016 was allegedly 40% higher per aircraft than what Dassault initially offered for 126 Rafales back in 2012, according to a report published in Business Standard.

It's election year and both the government and its rivals have sensational scandals involving the country's defence to attack each other with. The result may be chaotic to say the least.

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