Smart defecation chair, interactive mirror & wheelchair bike -innovations on Shark Tank S2

Mar 14, 2023

By: Srishti Magan

​Season 2 of Shark Tank India comes to an end

After two months and 166 pitches, season 2 of the reality show Shark Tank India came to an end on March 10. Among the many startups that appeared on the show, the following had truly innovative products:

Credit: Twitter

​Janitri

Janitri is a Bengaluru-based startup providing “medical-grade fetal and maternal monitoring solutions” via wearables, and affordable AI-enabled devices and software. It aims to reduce infant and maternal mortality rates. It’s backed by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Credit: Instagram

​P-Flow

P-flow is the world’s first portable and disposable kit that replaces the conventional uroflowmetry test, claimed founders, Dr Ashish and Dr Preeti Rawandale. A traditional uroflowmetry test measures the volume and speed of urine and takes 2-3 days at a hospital. With P-flow, patients can self-conduct the test at home. It provides results with 95 percent accuracy.

Credit: SonyLiv

Solinas Integrity

To end manual scavenging in India, IIT-incubated Solinas Integrity built HomoSEP- India’s first-ever septic tank cleaning robot that requires no manual intervention. Thanks to its patented hardware, it’s an affordable alternative compared to traditionally available machines.

Credit: SonyLiv

​NeoMotion​

NeoMotion is building products to assist wheelchair users in commuting independently and economically. It has two products — NeoFly, the first Indian wheelchair customised for the user and NeoBolt, an innovative all-terrain battery-powered bike for wheelchair users.

Credit: Instagram

​Portl

Portl is an interactive, smart fitness mirror interactive that offers personalised workouts to users by mapping their health vitals and fitness levels. It has embedded bio-sensors, an HD camera, Bluetooth and Wi-Fi. A voice-enabled AI system and visual display guide users through their workouts.

Credit: Instagram

​PadCare​

PadCare develops sustainable solutions for sanitary disposal and menstruation- PadCare bin to store hazardous waste for 30 days without bacterial growth or smell, PadCare X to recycle sanitary napkins into wood pulp and high-quality plastics, and PadCare Vend, a sanitary napkin vending machine.

Credit: Instagram

Geeani

Geeani is India’s smallest and cheapest e-tractor specially designed for farmers with small lands. Geeani is equipped with patented drivetrain technology and has a compact design. It weighs only 550 kg and is 8X more efficient than diesel tractors, claimed the founders.

Credit: Instagram

Mahantam

Mahantam is an early-stage startup manufacturing automatic tea glass-washing machines for roadside tea stalls. Its founder, 20-year-old Dhaval Prakashbhai Nai, designed the prototype after learning machine design from YouTube and practicing with scraps.

Credit: Instagram

Dhruv Vidyut Electric Conversion Kit (DVECK)

DVECK is an electric conversion kit that can be fitted onto any cycle to convert it into a motor and battery-powered electric cycle. It’s made of aircraft-grade aluminum. It can be installed on a bicycle in just 20 minutes and is free from damage by water, dust, mud, or even fire, claims its founder Gursaurabh Singh.

Credit: Instagram

​CureSee​

CureSee claims to be the world’s first AI-based vision therapy for people suffering from amblyopia or lazy eye. It’s a non-surgical treatment that acts like physical therapy to improve the coordination of the eye and brain. Amblyopia can’t be treated with contact lenses, eyeglasses, and surgery, and at present, patients use an eye patch to improve coordination.

Credit: Instagram

​Sahayatha​

Sahayatha builds wheelchairs with an inbuilt smart defecation device that offers cleansing assistance to users to independently wash after defecation — maintaining hygiene and dignity. It has two products — a non-recliner chair priced at ₹29,999 and a recliner, multi-purpose chair priced at ₹39,999.

Credit: Instagram

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