India’s think tank NITI Aayog is making AI simple and fun for 2.5 million students


  • Amitabh Kant, CEO of NITI Aayog said that India can add 1.3% to its GDP on an annual basis through the use of machine learning and artificial intelligence.
  • NITI Aayog and NASSCOM jointly launched Let’s learn AI module to help create an AI Curriculum for students.
  • It will be implemented across 5,000 Atal Tinkering Labs (ATL) — catering to over 2.5 million students
  • The global AI market is anticipated to touch $15 trillion over the next decade.
As India moves to adopt digitization, artificial intelligence can be a ‘valuable contributor’ to the country’s gross domestic product (GDP).

On the sidelines of the launch of Let’s learn AI module, Amitabh Kant, CEO of NITI Aayog said, “India can add 1.3% to its GDP on an annual basis through the use of machine learning and artificial intelligence.”


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As per the global estimates, the AI market is anticipated to touch $15 trillion over the next decade — with India contributing nearly a trillion dollars to it.

Kant added that the government schemes like Ayushman Bharat and GST can facilitate ethical use of these emerging technologies.

In a bid to boost AI participation at the school level, the initiative, rolled out by the government think tank NITI Aayog, Atal Innovation Mission (AIM) in collaboration with IT industry body NASSCOM, will create an AI Curriculum.

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“This is the first ever industry government academia initiative on such a scale to keep the school students abreast of latest technologies," said R Ramanan, mission director at Atal Innovation Mission.


The module — enabled with videos, experiments and concepts of AI — will be implemented across 5,000 Atal Tinkering Labs (ATL) — catering to over 2.5 million students. The curriculum will include the latest technologies from top notch companies like Microsoft, Adobe, SAP Labs, Wipro and Nasscom among others.

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This will help the country find alternatives to overcome the challenges of a shared connected zero-emission world, improving learning outcomes, diseases like tuberculosis, cancer and more.

“This module is path breaking. It combines playing and academics, and our job is to make things very interesting. We want to make artificial intelligence great fun, so that children can enjoy, evolve and learn from it,” NITI Aayog said.

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