Google is going local by grooming Indian content providers

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Google is going local by grooming Indian content providers

  • Google is going to go from city to city to train content creators in India on how to localise their portals in Indian languages.
  • The Silicon Valley tech giant is looking to build whole online ecosystems around local content.
  • Google executives from Search and AdSense will also be present at the event.
Google’s set to groom content providers in the Indian market with its Webmaster Conference that kicks off on June 17, and is open to anyone who wishes to participate.

The Silicon Valley tech giant is hosting workshops across 15 cities in five Indian languages — Hindi, Bengali, Marathi, Tamil and Telugu — along with English.

Google has been very clear of its impetus on localization from the very beginning. During the Google I/O developers conference 2019, Google had multiple presentations and new features that allowed app developers to customise their apps for markets in different regions with different languages.
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Essentially, the tech giant is looking to create ecosystems around local languages so that local content is more abundant online.

Building an ecosystem

In order to build an entirely localised ecosystem, Google’s aim isn’t just to help content creators get familiar with languages other than English online, but to also help them understand Google’s underlying principles.

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The participants will have the opportunity to talk with people to actually work behind the scenes at Google on platforms like AdSense and Google Search.

The Webmaster Conference is a rebranded version of Google’s Search Conference conducted last year, which had attracted 700 content creators from different parts of the country.

The agenda also includes two workshops, in Mumbai and Bangalore, that are designated as ‘women only’.

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