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Latest satellite images show efforts to free the giant container ship, Ever Given, stuck in Suez Canal

Latest satellite images show efforts to free the giant container ship, Ever Given, stuck in Suez Canal
  • The 1,300ft long, 200,000-tonne vessel has been stuck there for more than three days.
  • Dredging of the bottom and the banks of the canal has now began to free the ship.
  • Over 200 ships are caught in the backlog, costing the global economy an estimated $400 million per hour.

The latest effort to remove the giant container ship, Ever Given, which has been blocking a vital passageway in Egypt's Suez Canal for more than three days has been captured on satellite imagery.

The owner of the Ever Given, Yukito Higaki, apologized for causing "tremendous trouble" and told Japanese media that he hopes it will be refloated on Saturday.

The owner of the Ever Given, Yukito Higaki, apologized for causing "tremendous trouble" and told Japanese media that he hopes it will be refloated on Saturday.
Dredging of the bottom and the Suez Canal banks to try and free the container ship Ever Given on March 27, 2021. Kristin Carringer/Maxar

Higaki, who is president of Shoei Kisen Kaisha, the company which owns the container ship, added that 10 tugboats had been deployed to dredge the banks and canal bottom, Insider previously reported.

He said: "The ship is not taking water. There is no problem with its rudders and propellers. Once it refloats, it should be able to operate," according to the BBC.

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The White House has also offered to provide assistance.

The White House has also offered to provide assistance.
A close-up of the excavation of the Ever Given from the Suez Canal on March 27, 2021. Kristin Carringer/Maxar

White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki told reporters during a news conference on Friday: "We're tracking the situation very closely. We understand that Egyptian officials are working to remove the tanker as soon as possible and continue traffic. We're consulting with our Egyptian partners about how we can best support their efforts."

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The 1,300ft long, 200,000-tonne vessel has caused the backlogging of more than 200 ships across the Red Sea.

The 1,300ft long, 200,000-tonne vessel has caused the backlogging of more than 200 ships across the Red Sea.
Ships stuck waiting in the traffic jam in the Suez Canal on March 27, 2021. Kristin Carringer/Maxar

It may also lead to shortages of toilet paper, coffee, furniture, and other imported goods and stockpiling as seen during COVID-19.

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The current standstill is costing the global economy an estimated $400 million per hour.

The current standstill is costing the global economy an estimated $400 million per hour.
An overview of the effort to refloat Ever Given in the Suez Canal on March 27, 2020. Kristin Carringer/Maxar

Lloyd's List, a British shipping news journal, also noted that the Suez Canal is responsible for 10% of all international trade with around 1.9 million barrels of oil transported through it every day.

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