Check out these inscriptions World War I soldiers scratched on underground caves as they hid from German bombing

The caves are only accessible by small spiral stairs in the Bouzincourt church seen below.

The caves are only accessible by small spiral stairs in the Bouzincourt church seen below.
Share Slide

Some 12 yards under the surface, the caves were used by locals as early as the 17th century to store food and shelter their families and livestock.

Some 12 yards under the surface, the caves were used by locals as early as the 17th century to store food and shelter their families and livestock.
Share Slide

"They knew that they may be about to die," Gusky told Reuters in 2015.

"They knew that they may be about to die," Gusky told Reuters in 2015.

"We all want to be known, we all want to feel like our lives matter," Gusky said. "And so here on these walls we see them writing their last message to all of us, not knowing if anyone would ever see it."

Share Slide

Many of the shapes carved out of the cave walls are designed specifically to allow a postcard to be inserted there, Gusky said.

Many of the shapes carved out of the cave walls are designed specifically to allow a postcard to be inserted there, Gusky said.
Share Slide

Others are inscriptions of the name of a soldier, often followed by details of his injuries. Of the 829 names recorded in the caves, around 500 are of Canadian soldiers.

Others are inscriptions of the name of a soldier, often followed by details of his injuries. Of the 829 names recorded in the caves, around 500 are of Canadian soldiers.
Share Slide

While others are crudely carved flags or hearts.

While others are crudely carved flags or hearts.
Share Slide

There are even relics not carved in the stone.

There are even relics not carved in the stone.
Share Slide

More from our Partners