Sen. Lindsey Graham tests positive for COVID-19, says he's experiencing 'mild symptoms'

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Sen. Lindsey Graham tests positive for COVID-19, says he's experiencing 'mild symptoms'
Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina. AP Photo/Patrick Semansky
  • Sen. Lindsey Graham said on Monday that he'd tested positive for COVID-19.
  • "I feel like I have a sinus infection and at present time I have mild symptoms," he tweeted.
  • The Republican senator said he'd been vaccinated against the coronavirus.

Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina announced in a tweet on Monday that he had tested positive for COVID-19.

"I was just informed by the House physician I have tested positive for #COVID19 even after being vaccinated," he tweeted. "I started having flu-like symptoms Saturday night and went to the doctor this morning."

The Republican senator added that he was glad he'd received the coronavirus vaccine and that he'd begin to quarantine.

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"I feel like I have a sinus infection and at present time I have mild symptoms," he continued. "I will be quarantining for ten days. I am very glad I was vaccinated because without vaccination I am certain I would not feel as well as I do now. My symptoms would be far worse."

Graham got his COVID-19 shot in December, shortly after the Food and Drug Administration authorized two vaccines, made by Moderna and Pfizer, for emergency use in the United States.

He tweeted at the time: "Thank God for those who produced these vaccines. If enough of us take it, we will get back to normal lives."

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Graham received the Pfizer vaccine, his spokesperson told Insider.

Graham has been at the Capitol in recent days without a mask. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's guidelines say vaccinated people do not need to wear a face covering in areas of low transmission. A CNN survey in May found that 92% of senators were vaccinated.

Unlike the House, the Senate does not require members and staffers to wear masks.

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Coronavirus cases have been rising in the US as the highly contagious Delta variant spreads rapidly. The CDC director said last month that unvaccinated people made up the majority of new serious infections.

The CDC has said that while breakthrough cases among vaccinated people are to be expected, as no vaccine is 100% effective, there's evidence that the vaccines are highly effective at preventing severe illness, hospitalization, and death.

Jen Psaki, the White House press secretary, said on Monday that data indicated that breakthrough cases were rare and mostly mild.

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"We certainly do hope that Senator Graham has a speedy recovery," Psaki told reporters.

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