Residents in the Carolinas and Virginia are rushing to prepare for Hurricane Florence - here's what it looks like on the ground

hurricane florence

Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Plywood covers the windows of the Lager Heads Tavern as they prepare for the arrival of Hurricane Florence on September 11, 2018 in Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina.

Evacuations have been ordered across Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina on Monday and Tuesday, as Hurricane Florence approaches the US for a potentially record-breaking landfall.

Governors from the three states in the storm's path issued harsh warnings for citizens to evacuate immediately, causing a harried scene among stores and communities to prepare for the possibly devastating storm.
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Here's what it looks like on the ground:
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Hurricane Florence has been showering the Carolinas and Virginia with rain before it's set to make record-breaking landfall in North Carolina later this week.

Hurricane Florence has been showering the Carolinas and Virginia with rain before it's set to make record-breaking landfall in North Carolina later this week.

Source: Business Insider

Some citizens weathered the very early signs of the storm with ease, but reports and warnings from public officials are painting an increasingly dangerous picture.

Some citizens weathered the very early signs of the storm with ease, but reports and warnings from public officials are painting an increasingly dangerous picture.
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Coastal counties in Virginia, South and North Carolina were all under mandatory evacuation as of Tuesday afternoon.

Coastal counties in Virginia, South and North Carolina were all under mandatory evacuation as of Tuesday afternoon.

Source: Business Insider

After urging from state officials, citizens in coastal communities of the Carolinas sought precautionary measures.

After urging from state officials, citizens in coastal communities of the Carolinas sought precautionary measures.
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Vulnerable residents got plywood and sand bags to protect their properties, like these North Carolina residents who gathered sand from the beach Tuesday morning as the hurricane was set to make landfall over the state.

Vulnerable residents got plywood and sand bags to protect their properties, like these North Carolina residents who gathered sand from the beach Tuesday morning as the hurricane was set to make landfall over the state.

Source: NBC

Residents also set out for other supplies, including water ...

Residents also set out for other supplies, including water ...
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... and propane.

... and propane.

Source: NBC

The rush to prepare with basic supplies left stores' shelves bare.

The rush to prepare with basic supplies left stores' shelves bare.
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South Carolina Highway Patrol was on hand to direct traffic along the major roadways Gov. Henry McMaster announced would have reversed lanes to guide traffic away from the coast and assist the mass exodus.

South Carolina Highway Patrol was on hand to direct traffic along the major roadways Gov. Henry McMaster announced would have reversed lanes to guide traffic away from the coast and assist the mass exodus.

Source: Business Insider

Some South Carolina landmarks, like the Surfside Beach Pier, still show signs of damage from 2016's Hurricane Matthew. McMaster warned Florence's water damage could surpass that storm.

Some South Carolina landmarks, like the Surfside Beach Pier, still show signs of damage from 2016's Hurricane Matthew. McMaster warned Florence's water damage could surpass that storm.

Source: Business Insider

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Airmen from South Carolina's National Guard helped with the preparations — just a few of the 1,600 soldiers and airmen who were mobilized to assist with the storm.

Airmen from South Carolina's National Guard helped with the preparations — just a few of the 1,600 soldiers and airmen who were mobilized to assist with the storm.

Source: National Guard

Current predictions say Hurricane Florence could be the most powerful storm to make landfall in North Carolina, as no Category 4 hurricane has ever made landfall in the state.

Current predictions say Hurricane Florence could be the most powerful storm to make landfall in North Carolina, as no Category 4 hurricane has ever made landfall in the state.

Source: Business Insider

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As of Tuesday afternoon, forecasters are predicting the storm will make landfall in North Carolina on Friday.

As of Tuesday afternoon, forecasters are predicting the storm will make landfall in North Carolina on Friday.

Source: Business Insider