Earnings season kick off this week. Here are 6 companies to watch - and what to look out for.

JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon.JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon.AP Images

  • This week kicks off third-quarter earnings season, with major US companies revealing how trade war pressures, recession warnings, and interest-rate cuts affected their earnings and future sentiments.
  • Banks and brokerages make up most of the mid-October reports, with JPMorgan Chase, Wells Fargo, and Goldman Sachs scheduled to release their figures on October 15.
  • Here are six of the biggest US firms reporting earnings this week, and what to look for when they do.
  • Visit the Markets Insider homepage for more stories.

The last three months saw trade war escalations, recession warnings, and Federal Reserve interest rate cuts. This week will give the latest insights on how these factors and countless others affected companies' finances.

The first week of third-quarter earnings season is packed with banks and brokerages. JPMorgan Chase, Wells Fargo, and Goldman Sachs are all slated to report their latest figures October 15.

Here's what to look for when six of the largest companies in the US announce their latest quarterly earnings. All estimates are sourced from Bloomberg.

Read more: The market's next test: Bank of America weighs in on which sectors will crush it this earnings season - and which will flounder

Discover Business Insider Intelligence's Brand New Coverage Area: Banking

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Goldman Sachs (GS) — October 15

Goldman Sachs (GS) — October 15

Goldman's stock trades at the same level as it did nearly three years ago as the company continues to pivot from an investment bank to a more consumer-focused firm. Two of the company's critical revenue streams, trading and investment banking, face new competition in the form of commission-free trading and cheap robo-advisers.

The third quarter also marks the end of CEO David Solomon's first year helming the company, so investors will surely want to hear more on how his leadership will move the company into the digital age.

The earnings report is unlikely to reveal a sudden change in Goldman's strategies, and instead show steady growth in new sectors and a move away from traditional businesses. Look for strong figures in the bank's lending, retail banking, and savings account businesses to signal success in Goldman's transition period.

Here are Wall Street's quarterly estimates heading into the week:

  • Revenue: estimated $8.34 billion, versus $8.65 billion in the year-ago period
  • Earnings per share: estimated $4.95, versus $6.28 in the year-ago period

Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) — October 15

Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) — October 15

Marred by numerous lawsuits related to the nation's opioid crisis, Johnson & Johnson will look to quell investors' fears and prove that recent court rulings haven't eaten away at too much of the company's cash pile.

It also has a number of highly profitable drugs scheduled to come off patent and face greater competition in the near future. Updates on future drugs, and the massive sums they could bring in, would appeal to shareholders.

The firm has acquired several medical tech companies over the last few years, so any devices moving further in trials would likely boost investor sentiment.

Here are Wall Street's quarterly estimates heading into the week:

  • Revenue: estimated $20.10 billion, versus $20.35 billion in the year-ago period
  • Earnings per share: estimated $2.00, versus $2.05 in the year-ago period

JPMorgan Chase (JPM) — October 15

JPMorgan Chase (JPM) — October 15

JPMorgan Chase is the largest US bank by market cap, making it among the most exposed to a slowing global economy and the Federal Reserve's latest policy decisions. The most critical areas to watch are whether JPM can keep momentum in its equities, lending, and bond markets.

The bank's updated net interest margin — the difference between funds' cost and the rate charged on consumer loans — will give the most insight on whether the firm is outmaneuvering the economic storm or falling victim. Shareholders will also seek updates on the bank's plan to add hundreds of new branches across the country.

Here are Wall Street's quarterly estimates heading into the week:

  • Revenue: estimated $28.47 billion, versus $27.82 billion in the year-ago period
  • Earnings per share: estimated $2.45, versus $2.36 in the year-ago period

Wells Fargo (WFC) — October 15

Wells Fargo (WFC) — October 15

The beleaguered bank has a new CEO in Charles Scharf, and analysts are eager to hear of his vision for the future during his first earnings call with Wells Fargo.

The firm is still haunted by its 2016 fake account scandal, and after a several-month-long search for a new permanent chief executive, the bank's leadership will likely want to set the firm on a new track and improve public perception.

The bank's last earnings report showed the company suffering from declining net interest income, and the Federal Reserve has pushed its benchmark interest rate lower since then. Investors will want to see strong revenue figures offsetting any further drop in deposit-sourced income.

Here are Wall Street's quarterly estimates heading into the week:

  • Revenue: estimated $21.16 billion, versus $21.46 billion in the year-ago period
  • Earnings per share: estimated $1.18, versus $1.16 in the year-ago period

IBM Corp. (IBM) — October 16

IBM Corp. (IBM) — October 16

Like Goldman Sachs, IBM is in the midst of a tech-driven shift. The once hardware-heavy firm is placing greater focus on its cloud computing business, and recently completed its acquisition of cloud software firm Red Hat.

Signs the company can compete with cloud giants like Microsoft and Amazon as it transitions its core business will surely appeal to shareholders.

Investors will be looking for IBM to signal steady growth as it folds Red Hat into its cloud endeavors. They'll also want to see how the company's future guidance shifts as it dives further into the cloud sector and leaves its once-core revenue streams behind.

Here are Wall Street's quarterly estimates heading into the week:

  • Revenue: estimated $18.22 billion, versus $18.76 billion in the year-ago period
  • Earnings per share: estimated $2.67, versus $3.42 in the year-ago period

Netflix (NFLX) — October 18

Netflix (NFLX) — October 18

Netflix tumbled more than 10% after its last earnings report after reporting subscriber growth well under analysts estimates.

Subscriber trends are surely going to take center stage for shareholders and analysts alike, as the streaming market is poised to see more competition than ever once Apple and Disney enter the fray.

Wall Street analysts will also look for viewership updates to signal strength in Netflix's original offerings. Both Goldman Sachs and UBS recently downgraded the stock but reiterated their "buy" ratings, emphasizing the importance of original content in the streaming wars.

The analysts also noted that Netflix's first-mover advantage in the space should give it time to bolster its catalogue once competitors begin taking market share.

Here are Wall Street's quarterly estimates heading into the week:

  • Revenue: estimated $5.25 billion, versus $4.00 billion in the year-ago period
  • Earnings per share: estimated $1.25, versus $1.04 in the year-ago period
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