Tinder user creates a 17-page contract for her boyfriend two weeks after their first date: "We treat our relationship almost like a business interaction"

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Tinder user creates a 17-page contract for her boyfriend two weeks after their first date: "We treat our relationship almost like a business interaction"
The pair met on Tinder. Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images
  • A Tinder user drafted a 17-page contract for her boyfriend that outlined her terms and conditions.
  • It had four main objectives, including honesty and clear communication, The Sun reported.
  • The idea was sparked after Annie Wright had her "boundaries crossed" in a previous relationship.
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Annie Wright first met Michael Head, the man who would later become her boyfriend, on Tinder.

Two weeks after meeting, the 21-year-old drafted a 17-page relationship contract for him, outlining the terms and conditions he needed to agree to, The Sun reported.

The contract came with four objectives: honesty; awareness of your partner's needs; clear communication; and alignment in both parties' intentions.

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In the beginning, Wright said she was initially joking about creating a contract, after having her "boundaries crossed" in a previous relationship. The couple eventually agreed it was actually a good idea, however.

"He was like 'I want us to be boyfriend and girlfriend'. In order to be ready for that, we had to lay some serious ground rules," Wright recalled her boyfriend telling her.

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Within the contract, Wright outlined all of her expectations, which asked her boyfriend for "romantic gestures once every two weeks," and no silent treatment, according to The Sun.

Other terms asked Head to "work out at least five times a week alone" and pay for date nights.

"We treat our relationship almost like a business interaction," Wright told The Sun. "We deal with conflict like partners in business would. We sit down and treat it more like we're partners in life, and love is an added bonus."

Although it may seem unusual, other couples have made similar moves.

In a New York Times "Modern Love" column, author Mandy Len Catron said she and her partner signed a four-page, single-spaced document, which addressed everything from how long house guests can stay over to who was responsible for paying a certain bill.

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"Our contract addresses much of what must be negotiated in any relationship," Len Catron wrote.

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