The drug controller of India has ordered Johnson & Johnson to halt manufacturing its talc in question until further investigation: Report

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  • The Drug Controller General of India (DCGI) has now asked the US multinational Johnson and Johnson to stop the use of raw materials in the talc in question in its two manufacturing units — Mulund plant in Mumbai and Baddi unit in Himachal Pradesh — until there are further updations in the investigation that certains the purity of its baby powder.
  • The drug regulators are scanning the authenticity of Reuters report to check whether there are any traces of asbestos in the talc, under the Drugs and Cosmetics Act.
  • The company reportedly said that the drug inspectors had visited certain manufacturing units and took samples of its baby powder.
The Drug Controller General of India (DCGI) has now asked the US Multinational Johnson and Johnson to stop the use of raw materials in the talc in question in its two manufacturing units — Mulund plant in Mumbai and Baddi unit in Himachal Pradesh — until there are further updates in the investigation that ascertains the purity of its baby powder.

The drug regulators are scanning the authenticity of Reuters report to check whether there are any traces of asbestos in the talc, under the Drugs and Cosmetics Act, reported Business Today citing Eswara Reddy, DGCI. The samples will be tested in our laboratories, he added.

In fact, as Indian drug regulators investigate the claim, US multinational Johnson & Johnson’s moves aggressively to refute damning allegations made by a recent Reuters report claiming the company ‘knew for decades’ that traces of asbestos may have been found in its baby powder.

J&J, ever since the allegations came out, has been refuting it and said that they have been using every possible method to test and none found the talc to have asbestos.

The company reportedly said that the drug inspectors had visited certain manufacturing units and took samples of its baby powder. In support of their product, the company also said that the talc was found to be safe after decades of research and reviews from across the world.

While, the drug regulator Central Drugs Standard Control Organization (CDSCO) said that the baby powder product was investigated earlier in 2016 as well, but the test found no traces of asbestos and was declared as being compliant with Indian regulatory standards, the company also counterattacked the claim saying that its products had been tested before and the talc is ‘safe and Asbestos free.’

The talc is, practically, omnipresent in Indian homes as well as globally, and has a potential market share of nearly 1.3 billion in India.

See also:

India’s drug regulator is said to be investigating Johnson & Johnson’s baby powder for alleged traces of cancer-causing Asbestos: Report

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