A part of Windsor Castle that's been closed to the public for over 150 years just reopened - and it's been completely revamped. Take a peek inside.

Windsor CastleImage Source / Getty Images

After over 150 years, the Inner Hall of Windsor Castle has finally reopened to the public.

According to the BBC, Inner Hall was originally built in the 1820s by King George IV. He used it as a State Entrance Hall, a place where to greet his guests.

But it was Queen Victoria, who, in 1866, closed the Inner Hall, hoping to build a smaller State Entrance. Ultimately, her intention never came to fruition. Instead the Inner Hall remained closed and was used as a storage room throughout the following decades.

Now, the Royal Collection Trust has announced that the Inner Hall has reopened. The project is part of the Future Programme, a series by the Trust to "enhance the visitor experience at Windsor Castle," per a press statement released by the Royal Collection Trust.

The Inner Hall is in a part of Windsor Castle that dates back to the 14th century, when King Edward III transformed the castle from a military fortress into a Gothic palace. Since then, it has been in use as one of many British royal residences.

Here's what the Inner Hall looks like today.

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Windsor Castle has been in use for over 900 years. It was first established as a royal residence in 1110 by King Henry I.

Windsor Castle has been in use for over 900 years. It was first established as a royal residence in 1110 by King Henry I.

Source: Royal UK, Royal Collection Trust

The Inner Hall is in a part of the castle which dates back to the mid-14th century, when King Edward III had turned Windsor into a palace. Here's what it looks like today, post-renovations:

The Inner Hall is in a part of the castle which dates back to the mid-14th century, when King Edward III had turned Windsor into a palace. Here's what it looks like today, post-renovations:

Source: Royal Collection Trust

In the 1820s, King George IV used the Inner Halls as a State Entrance to welcome his guests.

In the 1820s, King George IV used the Inner Halls as a State Entrance to welcome his guests.

Source: Royal Collection Trust

In 1866, Queen Victoria closed the Inner Hall, hoping to build a smaller State Entrance. But her intention never came to fruition, and the existing hall remained idle for 150 years.

In 1866, Queen Victoria closed the Inner Hall, hoping to build a smaller State Entrance. But her intention never came to fruition, and the existing hall remained idle for 150 years.

Source: Royal Collection Trust

The Inner Hall can be seen as visitors take the near-three mile walk, which was created by Charles II in the 1680s. The Royal Collection Trust also announced that a new path will be opened to the hall, allowing the public to see it for the first time since it was closed over a century ago.

The Inner Hall can be seen as visitors take the near-three mile walk, which was created by Charles II in the 1680s. The Royal Collection Trust also announced that a new path will be opened to the hall, allowing the public to see it for the first time since it was closed over a century ago.

Source: Royal Collection Trust

In another press statement, the Royal Collection Trust also announced that they will open up Windsor's first permanent cafe next year, further enhancing the overall visitor experience at the castle.

In another press statement, the Royal Collection Trust also announced that they will open up Windsor's first permanent cafe next year, further enhancing the overall visitor experience at the castle.

Source: Royal Collection Trust

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