Theresa May survives Conservative party vote of no confidence

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May addresses the media outside 10 Downing Street after it was announced that the Conservative Party will hold a vote of no confidence in her leadership, in London, Britain, December 12, 2018.Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May addresses the media outside 10 Downing Street after it was announced that the Conservative Party will hold a vote of no confidence in her leadership, in London, Britain, December 12, 2018.Reuters / Peter Nicholls

  • Theresa May has survived a confidence vote in her leadership.
  • The vote was triggered after 48 MPs sent letters expressing no confidence in the prime minister's leadership.
  • Many MPs remain deeply unhappy at her plans for Brexit.

LONDON - Theresa May has survived a confidence vote in her leadership by Conservative MPs, meaning she can continue to serve as prime minister.

May won a confidence vote in her leadership clear of the 158 votes needed to oust her.

However, the result only came after the prime minister assured MPs on Wednesday evening that she would stand down before the next general election.

"In my heart I would like to lead the party into the next election but I accept that won't happen," May told Conservative MPs.

The vote was held after at least 48 Conservative MPs sent letters to Tory MP Graham Brady, chair of the 1922 Committee, expressing no confidence in Theresa May's leadership of the party.

Many were unhappy with the Brexit plan she negotiated in Brussels, and discontent reached a tipping point when she delayed a parliamentary vote on the deal which was scheduled for Tuesday.

Brady notified the prime minister that he had received at least 48 letters on Tuesday evening. He announced the news publicly on Wednesday morning, giving Tory MPs just one day to weigh up whether to support or oppose the prime minister.

He was criticised by some Tory MPs who oppose the prime minister for organising the vote at short notice, which some believe would hand May a crucial advantage because it would not give them time to co-ordinate their opposition.

However, Brady said party rules dictate that a vote should be held as soon as possible.

This is a developing story.

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