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  5. Speaker Johnson says Republicans will move forward with their controversial impeachment of DHS Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas next week

Speaker Johnson says Republicans will move forward with their controversial impeachment of DHS Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas next week

Brent D. Griffiths   

Speaker Johnson says Republicans will move forward with their controversial impeachment of DHS Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas next week
  • House Speaker Mike Johnson wants to move forward with a historic impeachment.
  • Johnson wants his party to vote as soon as next week on impeaching DHS Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas.

House Speaker Mike Johnson said on Friday that his party will move forward with its controversial decision to impeach Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas, raising the possibility he will become just the second Cabinet official in history to be impeached.

"When we return next week, by necessity, the House Homeland Security Committee will move forward with Articles of Impeachment against Secretary Mayorkas," Johnson wrote in a "Dear Colleague" letter. "A vote on the floor will be held as soon as possible thereafter."

Johnson said that his office "has documented at least 64 specific actions taken by this administration that effectively opened our border and instituted the current chaos."

The White House quickly slammed the effort.

"Such a silly claim," White House spokesperson Ian Sams wrote on X, formerly known as Twitter. "There's no 'necessity' In fact—since before they even took the majority, House Rs have been crowing about impeaching somebody…anybody…out of partisan political bloodlust."

Johnson and Republicans have argued that the Biden administration's immigration policies amount to a dereliction of duty so great that it requires lawmakers to impeach Mayorkas.

Jonathan Turley, a George Washington law professor and frequent voice for conservatives on impeachment, has argued that impeaching Mayorkas for these reasons would set a dangerous precedent.

"… [B]eing a bad person is not impeachable—or many cabinets would be largely empty," Turley wrote in The Daily Beast last month. "Moreover, being bad at your job is not an impeachable offense. Even really bad. Even Mayorkas' level of bad. If that were the case, he would be only the latest in a long line of cabinet officers frog-marched into Congress for constitutional termination."

Some House Republicans have also voiced concern about impeaching Mayorkas, raising the prospect that the vote could be extremely close. Right now, the GOP controls one of the smallest majorities ever in the history of Congress due to early retirements and former Rep. George Santos' expulsion.

"He is certainly guilty of that and more: maladministration, malfeasance, and neglect of duties on a truly historic scale. But these are not impeachable offenses," Rep. Tom McClintock, a California Republican, previously said in a lengthy statement denouncing the push.

Congress has only ever impeached one Cabinet Secretary: former Secretary of War William Belknap. Belknap, who served in the Grant administration, was accused of taking bribes.

Johnson can take solace in the fact that some centrist Republicans, including those that represent seats that President Joe Biden won, have expressed openness to impeaching Mayorkas.

"If there is any high crime higher than allowing potential terrorists into this country to cause harm to American people, I'm not sure what else we need to hear other than that," Rep. Anthony D'Esposito, a New York Republican, previously told CNN.




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