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Chip-company boss says the idea of humans losing control of AI keeps him up at night

Jyoti Mann   

Chip-company boss says the idea of humans losing control of AI keeps him up at night
  • Rene Haas, CEO of Arm, told Bloomberg the idea of humans losing control of AI costs him sleep.
  • The company that makes blueprints for chips used to power AI tools, smartphones, and semiconductors.

The CEO of chip designer Arm said the idea of humans losing power over AI has kept him up at night.

Rene Haas told Bloomberg that AI needs "some override" and a "way that the system can be shut down."

After being asked about his AI fears, he said, "The thing I worry about most is humans losing capability."

He also told Bloomberg, "I think it will find its way into everything that we do, and every aspect of how we work, live, play. It's going to change everything over the next five-to-10 years."

The company designs chips that are used in smartphones, tablets, and LLMs. They are also used to manufacture semiconductors.

In a previous interview with Bloomberg, the CEO of the UK company said, "You can't really run AI without Arm" and without a central processing unit as it's "in every device you touch." Arm is everywhere, relative to AI, he added.

Last year, Softbank tried to sell Arm to US chip giant Nvidia in a $40 billion deal. Nvidia uses its chips for PC processors, Bloomberg reported.

After the sale was canceled, Arm listed on the US stock market in September, with its IPO valuing the company at $54.5 billion.

Softbank founder and CEO Masayoshi Son said on CNBC's news show "Squawk on the Street" in September that he "did not want to really sell" but that the pandemic made him go into "protective mode."

Son said during the interview, "I believed in the future of Nvidia back then, and it was right. And I believed in the combinations of the power of the two companies would be enormous."

He added, "I believed in the future of AI. And it's really now getting proved. And this is the beginning of big AI time and Arm is going to have a big role in that."

Before joining Arm, Haas spent seven years as vice president and general manager of the computing products group at Nvidia, the company website said.

Arm didn't immediately respond to Business Insider's request for comment.




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