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Not every iPhone is powerful enough to run Apple's AI features. Here's which models reportedly make the cut.

Jaures Yip   

Not every iPhone is powerful enough to run Apple's AI features. Here's which models reportedly make the cut.
  • Apple is expected to unveil iOS 18 with new AI features at its WWDC event on Monday.
  • The AI features will reportedly require at least an iPhone 15 Pro or the upcoming iPhone 16 lineup.

It sounds like Apple is betting its long-expected AI features will be enough to convince you to upgrade your iPhone — especially if the AI requires a top-of-the-line device.

Apple is expected to reveal iOS 18 at its annual developers conference, WWDC, on Monday.

The company's new AI software, which Bloomberg reported will be called "Apple Intelligence," will include features that run on-device — meaning they're powered directly by the iPhone's chips rather than relying on cloud servers. Some of the AI services will still rely on cloud-based computing, according to the report, but many will not.

So which iPhone models will make the cut? Not many, apparently.

The new AI features will require at least an iPhone 15 Pro or the upcoming iPhone 16 lineup, Bloomberg reported. The iPhone 16 and public launch of iOS 18 are both expected in the fall. Those with iPads and Macs will also require models with an M1 chip at minimum, according to the report.

Apple will be integrating the AI technology into several apps, including Mail, Voice Memos, and Photos, but users can choose to opt-in, Bloomberg reported.

The features will reportedly be focused on helping with everyday tasks, ranging from summarizing and helping compose emails to AI-suggested custom emojis while texting. Siri will also be getting an AI overhaul to allow users to command more specific tasks within apps, such as asking Siri to delete an email, according to Bloomberg.

Apple also inked a deal with OpenAI to help power some features, including a chatbot similar to ChatGPT, The Information and Bloomberg previously reported.

CEO Tim Cook, who has acknowledged that the smartphone market has been "tough" in the US recently, is likely hoping that the new generative AI offerings spur a big device upgrade cycle.

Apple's WWDC keynote kicks off Monday at 1 p.m. ET. Business Insider will be liveblogging the event.




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