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  4. Twitter staff are helping to remove bird logos at its HQ for the X rebrand, but one reportedly broke apart and is still there

Twitter staff are helping to remove bird logos at its HQ for the X rebrand, but one reportedly broke apart and is still there

Pete Syme   

Twitter staff are helping to remove bird logos at its HQ for the X rebrand, but one reportedly broke apart and is still there
  • Elon Musk has started having Twitter's iconic blue bird logo removed at the headquarters.
  • One sign couldn't be taken down as it broke apart, leaving remnants still attached, per an NYT reporter.

As Twitter rebrands to X, staff are taking down the iconic blue bird logos at its San Francisco headquarters.

But even removing signs has hit a bump in the road.

As somebody tried to unfasten a blue bird from the HQ's security desk, it broke apart, leaving remnants of the bird still attached, according to Ryan Mac, a New York Times tech reporter who cited two unnamed sources and has been covering the news of Twitter's rebrand.

And San Francisco police put a temporary halt to the dismantling of Twitter's exterior sign, due to concern over the boom lift causing "a possible unpermitted street closure."

The Times earlier reported that work had started on detaching a ten-foot-tall bird icon in the office's cafeteria.

It now appears to have a smaller X logo in its place, with a blue outline still visible beneath, per a photo tweeted by a Twitter employee.

Some Twitter employees also appear to have helped in the office redesign.

Yu Liu, whose LinkedIn says he is a lead product designer, tweeted a photo of a drill in front of the vast cafeteria logo.

That was in response to another Twitter employee, who said he was "bird hunting."

According to photos seen by the NYT, some Twitter meeting rooms have been renamed to "eXposure" and "s3Xy."

Musk's decision to rebrand the company has come under scrutiny.

"By changing Twitter's app name, Elon Musk will have singlehandedly wiped out over fifteen years of a brand name that has secured its place in our cultural lexicon," Mike Proulx, a vice president and research director at Forrester, said in a recent blog post.

"This is an extremely risky move because with X, Musk is essentially starting over while its competition is afoot," he added.

Proulx is referring to the recent arrival of Mark Zuckerberg's new social network, Threads, which attracted 100 million users within its first week. There is debate as to whether the buzz around this network has slowed since then, however. Data from Similarweb indicated that users are now spending 6 minutes on Threads a day, down from 21 minutes when it first launched.

Twitter did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment.


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