scorecardA Canadian photographer who built his 104-square-foot tiny house with his own hands says he 'house-hacked' his way into 'living for free'
  1. Home
  2. personal finance
  3. A Canadian photographer who built his 104-square-foot tiny house with his own hands says he 'house-hacked' his way into 'living for free'

A Canadian photographer who built his 104-square-foot tiny house with his own hands says he 'house-hacked' his way into 'living for free'

tiny house mackenzie duncan

Mackenzie Duncan

Canadian photographer Mackenzie Duncan lives in a tiny house on Vancouver Island.

  • A "tiny house" typically ranges from 100 to 400 square feet, less than a sixth of the size of an average house.
  • Canadian photographer Mackenzie Duncan lives in a tiny house on Vancouver Island.
  • He lives by a zero-waste philosophy, owns four plates, and doesn't have a TV.

As real estate prices continue to rise, many people are opting for smaller spaces and, ultimately, simpler lives. Tiny living isn't just an Instagram trend, but rather a way into a more budget-conscious, eco-friendly lifestyle.

Typically ranging from 100 to 400 square feet, compared to the average of 2,598 square feet for new US houses built in 2013, tiny homes not only require less resources to build, but produce only about 7% of the carbon-dioxide emissions of a full-size house, according to the American Institute of Architects.

Living in a space as small as your typical two-car garage isn't all that difficult, at least for someone like Canada-based photographer Mackenzie Duncan, who will tell you it's certainly more glamorous than living in a van, which he has also done.

Although tiny house living isn't without its challenges, Duncan told Business Insider that the little bit of extra work he's had to put in is well worth it in the end.

READ MORE ARTICLES ON




Advertisement