scorecardAir India says Alliance Air is no longer its subsidiary – here’s what it means for flyers
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Air India says Alliance Air is no longer its subsidiary – here’s what it means for flyers

Air India says Alliance Air is no longer its subsidiary – here’s what it means for flyers
Business2 min read
Alliance Air caters to Tier-2 and Tier-3 destinations on the domestic routes    Air India
  • Air India has announced that Alliance Air is no longer its subsidiary.
  • Customers who want to, or have booked flights with certain flight numbers will need to contact Alliance Air going forward.
  • Alliance Air currently serves 47 destinations with 18 aircraft in its fleet.
The Tata Group-owned Air India has announced that Alliance Air is no longer its subsidiary. The advisory comes merely a few months after the Tata Group acquired the debt-laden Air India from the Indian government.

What this means for passengers flying on tickets carrying flight numbers starting with certain characters is that they will not be managed or addressed by Air India.

In its advisory, Air India has stated that flight numbers with four digits starting with ‘9’, or three digits starting with ‘9I’, are Alliance Air flights. As such, Air India will not handle bookings or queries associated with these flights.

Alliance Air currently serves 47 destinations with a fleet of 18 aircraft. It operates on the domestic routes, connecting Tier-2 and Tier-3 destinations.

What this means for flyers



If you have recently booked a flight on the Air India network, you will want to check your flight number.

If it is a four-digit number, check if it starts with ‘9’. If it is a three-digit number, check if it starts with ‘9I’.

If it is an Alliance Air flight, you will have to connect with their customer care for any queries and support, at +91-44-4255 4255 and +91-44-3511 3511 or email at support@allianceair.in.


The Tata Group had earlier last year acquired Air India – several decades after the Indian government nationalised the airline in 1953. As part of the deal, the Tatas bid ₹2,700 crore in cash and took over ₹15,300 crore debt.

Its bid price of ₹18,000 crore is nearly 40% higher than the government’s reserve price of ₹12,900 crore. The other contender in the fray was a consortium led by SpiceJet promoter Ajay Singh, who bid ₹15,100 crore.

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