scorecardNew York City police will force people off crowded subway cars to enforce social distancing, even as trains fill to the brim with essential workers
  1. Home
  2. business
  3. news
  4. New York City police will force people off crowded subway cars to enforce social distancing, even as trains fill to the brim with essential workers

New York City police will force people off crowded subway cars to enforce social distancing, even as trains fill to the brim with essential workers

Graham Rapier   

New York City police will force people off crowded subway cars to enforce social distancing, even as trains fill to the brim with essential workers
Business2 min read
new york city subway coronavirus

Erin Lefevre/NurPhoto via Getty

  • New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said Monday the police will enforce social distancing on subways.
  • Some trains have been crowded, commuters said, as essential workers are still forced to travel to their jobs.
  • Many lines have seen service cuts beyond planned due to limited availability of train crews, the MTA said.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

It's a line many New Yorkers know well: "if you cannot fit on this train, there is another right behind."

Many straphangers, having had the wool pulled over their eyes before, aren't keen to take the conductors' advice. Soon, however, they may not have a choice.

Police officers will begin enforcing social distancing on subways this week, Mayor Bill de Blasio said Monday, despite complaints from essential workers that their usual trains have been packed following coronavirus-induced service cuts.

"I understand people are trying to get somewhere, but no one should be getting on a crowded train," the mayor told local station NY1. "Spread out throughout the train, wait for the next train.

"The PD's going to go out there, if they see any overcrowding, they're going to literally split it up, pull people off the train, move them along to different cars, whatever it takes."

On top of service cuts that have been deemed "essential service" for restaurant workers, healthcare professionals and others who must commute during the "New York on Pause" issued by the governor earlier in March, many lines have seen even less service thanks to limited availability of train crews.

"We are running as many trains as possible with the crews we have available," the Metropolitan Transit Authority said in service alerts Monday.

Do you have a personal experience with the coronavirus you'd like to share? Or a tip on how your town or community is handling the pandemic? Please email covidtips@businessinsider.com and tell us your story.

And get the latest coronavirus analysis and research from Business Insider Intelligence on how COVID-19 is impacting businesses.

NOW WATCH: Why Pikes Peak is the most dangerous racetrack in America.




Advertisement