India revamps its education policy after 34 years — scraps MPhil, proposes vocational courses from class 6, UG colleges to become autonomous

BCCL
  • The Indian government has allocated 6% of GDP as public investment in the education sector in India, up from 4.43% allocation.
  • The Major reforms under the NEP include a new grading system, push to vocational education, fee regulation, elimination of MPhil, etc.
  • Here are some highlights about the New Education Policy
The Indian government on July 29 approved the New Education Policy (NEP) and renamed the Ministry of Human Resource and Development as the Ministry of Education. The existing NEP was framed in 1986 and revised in 1992. The New Education Policy was part of the Bharatiya Janata Party's manifesto ahead of the 2014 general election.

The policy brings reforms to the entire Indian education system. The Indian government has allocated 6% of GDP as public investment in the education sector in India, up from 4.43% allocation.

The Major reforms under the NEP include a new grading system, push to vocational education, fee regulation, elimination of MPhil, etc. Moreover higher education institutions and other professional education institutes will be transformed into multi-disciplinary education.

Advertisement

Here are some highlights about the New Education Policy —

  • Universalise primary education in India
    The NEP aims to universalise primary education (3 to 6) years in the country in the next five years. It also aims to provide a foundational literacy and numeracy for all by 2025.
  • The 10+2 system will be divided into a 5+3+3+4 format
    Under the new 5+3+3+4 format, the first five years will be the foundation stage, including three years of primary education and class 1 and 2. The next three years will be the ‘preparatory’ stage. The next three years — between class six and class eight— will be the ‘middle’ stage. The last stage will be the ‘high’ stage comprising class 9,10,11, and 12.
  • MPhil courses to be discontinued
    Students who wish to pursue research can do it without MPhil. All courses at UG, PG, PhD level to be interdisciplinary.
  • All higher education institutions, except legal and medical colleges, to be governed by a single regulator
  • Reforms in board exams patterns
All the board exams will be held in two languages. Each subject offered in the board exam will have an objective, as well as description exam. Moreover, board exams are to be based on knowledge application.

  • Students to learn coding from class 6
    The NEP aims to encourage mathematical and scientific thinking in students. School curriculum will be reduced to core concepts; and include the integration of vocational education from class 6 under the new National Education Policy. Moreover, students will be allowed to learn coding from class 6.
  • Undergraduate colleges to be autonomous —
    Under Graded Autonomy, Academic, Administrative and Financial Autonomy will be given to colleges, on the basis of the status of their accreditation.
  • Proposal to conduct a common entrance exam for all colleges
    The government has proposed to conduct a single entrance for all higher education institutes in India. The exam, however, will be optional.
  • Home language, mother tongue or regional language to be medium of instruction up to class 5
Under NEP, all the students can study up to class 5 in their home/mother tongue or regional language. If possible, the students can also learn in their respective languages after grade 5. Moreover, the government will also develop e-courses in eight regional languages initially.

Advertisement

SEE ALSO:
EXCLUSIVE: M&M Financial Managing Director gets candid about the rights issue, the bleak prospects for this year and why there should be no more loan moratorium
India's broking industry just got the shock of its life – SEBI may soon allow investors to trade directly on the exchanges
These 10 Indian colleges have produced India’s most funded startup owners
{{}}