scorecard
  1. Home
  2. international
  3. news
  4. Half of the missiles Iran fired at Israel failed on launch or malfunctioned and crashed, reports say

Half of the missiles Iran fired at Israel failed on launch or malfunctioned and crashed, reports say

Mikhaila Friel   

Half of the missiles Iran fired at Israel failed on launch or malfunctioned and crashed, reports say
  • Iran's missile and drone attacks on Israel largely failed, with many intercepted or malfunctioning.
  • Around 60 of Iran's missiles failed on their own, multiple reports say.

Half of the missiles Iran fired at Israel over the weekend failed on launch or malfunctioned and crashed, according to reports.

More than 300 missiles and drones were fired toward Israel from Iran on Saturday evening in retaliation for an airstrike on the country's consulate in Syria.

Around 99% of the missiles launched were intercepted by Israel, the US, the UK, France, and Jordan.

Iran had warned for weeks that the attack was coming. That gave Israel's allies time to prepare — and avoided targeting civilian locations.

Israel praised the defense effort as a "significant strategic achievement." But around 60 of Iran's missiles failed on their own, according to several reports.

An estimated 50% of Iran's 120 ballistic missiles failed to launch or crashed in flight, unnamed US officials told CBS News and The Wall Street Journal.

The attack also consisted of 170 unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and 30 cruise missiles, none of which crossed into Israeli territory, according to an online statement shared by a spokesperson for Israel Defense Forces (IDF).

Speaking to CBS News, two US officials said five ballistic missiles made it through air defenses and impacted Israeli territory.

Four landed at Navatim Air Force Base, which was thought to be Iran's primary target. One hit a runway, one hit an empty hanger, and another hit a hanger that wasn't in use, the publication said. Meanwhile, another missile appeared to be aimed at a radar site in northern Israel but missed, the outlet added.

At the time of writing on Monday, one person — an unnamed 10-year-old girl — was reported as "severely injured" by shrapnel, the IDF confirmed. The details of her condition have not been released.

Though Israel has not yet said how it plans to respond, the IDF spokesperson said it is "prepared and ready for further developments and threats."

"We are doing and will do everything necessary to protect the security of the civilians of the State of Israel," they added.

Amir Saeid Iravani, Iran's ambassador to the UN, told Sky News that reports of Israel's forthcoming response are a "threat" and "talk, not an action."

He said Israel "would know what our second retaliation would be" and that they "understand the next one will be most decisive."

Iran ignored warnings from the US before it launched its attack. President Biden said on Friday that he expected Iran to attack Israel "sooner, rather than later." His message to Iran was short and simple: "Don't."

Sean McFate, a national security and foreign policy expert at Syracuse University, previously told BI that the Biden administration is losing its authority as its military support for Israel and simultaneous humanitarian aid for Gaza is sending mixed messages.

"The fact that the Biden administration is both arming Israel and sending aid to Gaza shows the world that the Biden team has no strategic competence," McFate said. "They've already lost control."

Representatives for the IDF, Iran's Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and the US Department of Defense did not immediately respond to a request for comment.




Advertisement