scorecardLawmakers want to stop the US military from naming things for Confederate soldiers. These 10 bases are still symbols of the Confederacy
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Lawmakers want to stop the US military from naming things for Confederate soldiers. These 10 bases are still symbols of the Confederacy

Lawmakers want to stop the US military from naming things for Confederate soldiers. These 10 bases are still symbols of the Confederacy
DefenseDefense2 min read
U.S. Army Soldiers assigned to Bravo Company, 3rd Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), clear an urban environment during brigade live fire exercise at Fort Polk, La. Mar.11, 2019    Capt. Justin Wright / US Army / DVIDS

  • The House of Representatives passed the defense spending bill with a measure preventing the Pentagon from further honoring the Confederacy. The US military, which defeated the Confederacy after a devastating toll of 620,000 dead, currently used 10 bases named for Confederate soldiers.
  • Fort Lee, in Virginia, is named after Gen. Robert E. Lee, the commander of the Confederate States Army and a slaveholder.
  • There's no plan to rename the installations that honor the Confederacy.
  • The measure comes amid a cultural reckoning about the legacy of the Civil War, with many citizens demanding the removal of statutes honoring leaders of a movement that fought to defend the enslavement of black people.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

The United States is still grappling with the legacy of the Civil War, but legislators in the House of Representatives are moving to prevent the military from naming any assets - including bases and warships - after Confederate soldiers or any locations of Confederate victory, Politico reported.

A draft of the National Defense Authorization Act passed the House last week, and contains explicit language barring the practice. Even if this amendment is signed into law, it wouldn't retroactively apply to assets currently honoring the Confederacy like the cruiser USS Chancellorsville, named for an important Confederate victory.

After a significant cultural reckoning with the legacy of the Confederacy, including the removal of statues and monuments honoring the Confederate dead, the military still uses 10 bases that honor Confederate soldiers - men that fought to uphold the practice of slavery.

"We are naming ships of the United States Navy after people who fought war against the United States," a veteran told Navy Times.

Read more: 2 US soldiers were killed in an Afghanistan firefight with the Taliban just days before peace talks resume

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