scorecardGood news for Trump: Jurors at his classified documents trial will come from counties that overwhelmingly voted for him in 2020
  1. Home
  2. Politics
  3. world
  4. news
  5. Good news for Trump: Jurors at his classified documents trial will come from counties that overwhelmingly voted for him in 2020

Good news for Trump: Jurors at his classified documents trial will come from counties that overwhelmingly voted for him in 2020

Sonam Sheth   

Good news for Trump: Jurors at his classified documents trial will come from counties that overwhelmingly voted for him in 2020
PoliticsPolitics2 min read
  • Trump's jurors in his classified docs trial will come from a very red swatch of South Florida.
  • The case's judge announced on Friday that the trial will start in May 2024 in Fort Pierce, Florida.

Former President Donald Trump hit the jackpot with his upcoming criminal trial over his handling of classified government documents.

US District Judge Aileen Cannon, who Trump nominated, signed an order Friday announcing that the former commander-in-chief will be on trial beginning May 24, 2024, in Fort Pierce. That's good news for Trump because Fort Pierce, in St. Lucie County, is in an overwhelmingly red area of South Florida.

Nearly 72% of voters in neighboring Okeechobee County voted for Trump in the 2020 election. And 66.8% of voters in Highland, 62% of voters in Martin, 60.4% of voters in Indian River, and 50.4% of voters in St. Lucie cast ballots for Trump.

Cannon, for her part, has been under the spotlight as Trump and the Justice Department spar over the timing of his trial.

The 41-year-old judge made headlines last year after handing down some bizarre legal rulings favoring the ex-president as part of the DOJ's investigation into Trump's handling of classified documents.

Cannon assigned a special master to review the documents that the FBI seized after Trump requested it. But she reversed her order and tossed out his case for a "lack of jurisdiction" after a federal appeals court overturned her initial ruling.

All eyes were on her when she was randomly selected to oversee the Justice Department's case against Trump this summer.

The special counsel Jack Smith's prosecutors argued that Trump should get a speedy trial that wrapped up by the end of the year. But Trump's lawyers argued that his trial in the case should be pushed until after the 2024 election, claiming that the former president's campaign schedule was clashing with his indictments and civil trials.

Cannon said in her Friday order that the "government's proposed schedule is atypically accelerated and inconsistent with ensuring a fair trial."

She added that discovery in the case is "exceedingly voluminous and will require substantial time to review and digest in accordance" with Trump's "right to a fair trial. And she said that the court "will be faced with extensive pre-trial motion practice on a diverse number of legal and factual issues, all in connection with a 38-count indictment."

"These factors are sufficient to designate this case complex," she wrote, "and the Court is unaware of any searchable case in which a court has refused a complex designation under comparable circumstances."




Advertisement