John Fetterman predicts Joe Manchin is 'not going to be around much longer' in the Senate: 'I'm going to get his parking space'

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John Fetterman predicts Joe Manchin is 'not going to be around much longer' in the Senate: 'I'm going to get his parking space'
Democratic Sens. John Fetterman of Pennsylvania and Joe Manchin of West Virginia.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images
  • Sen. John Fetterman predicted that fellow Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin won't be "around much longer."
  • Manchin hasn't announced 2024 plans. He could seek reelection, retire, or launch a presidential bid.
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Sen. John Fetterman is predicting that fellow Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin is unlikely to remain in the Senate past the end of his term in January 2025.

The Pennsylvania Democrat made the remark during an interview with the Washington Post, taking a swipe at his West Virginia colleague over his efforts to reinstate the Senate's dress code in September.

"At first I was really kind of angry [at Manchin]," Fetterman told the Post. "And then I realized, well, he's not going to be around much longer and I'm going to get his parking space."

Manchin has not yet announced his plans for 2024, when he would be up for re-election. He could seek re-election, retire, or even mount a third-party presidential campaign with No Labels.

For Fetterman, it's the latest example of eschewing the decorum typical of the upper chamber. Whether it's leading calls for Sen. Bob Menendez's resignation, insisting on wearing casual attire in the Capitol complex, or offering borderline-graphic quotes to reporters, Fetterman's tenure has been unconventional.

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John Fetterman predicts Joe Manchin is 'not going to be around much longer' in the Senate: 'I'm going to get his parking space'
Fetterman and Manchin chatting in the Senate basement on June 22, 2023.Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post via Getty Images

In September, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer unilaterally changed the chamber's dress code to accommodate Fetterman. Fetterman later presided over the Senate in casual clothing.

That quickly generated a backlash from senators, particularly Republicans, and Manchin eventually introduced the "Show Our Respect to the Senate (SHORTS)" resolution to reinstate the dress code.

The West Virginia Democrat even reportedly told Fetterman directly that the dress code change was "wrong" and that it "basically degrades the institution."

Fetterman eventually caved, telling Insider at the time would comply with the "silly dress code." Manchin's resolution passed via a voice vote that evening.

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