scorecardMaking the case for a password-free world
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Making the case for a password-free world

Making the case for a password-free world
Tech4 min read

  • Data breaches have revealed billions of passwords, demonstrating the necessity for businesses to use a solution that protects both staff and customers.
  • Passwordless authentication will aid in improving both security and user experience for all enterprises.
  • From a security standpoint, a certificate-based passwordless method is significantly more secure than utilising regular credentials.


Despite its long-drawn history, passwords are not the most secure solution for today's digital world. Data breaches have revealed billions of passwords, demonstrating the necessity for businesses to use an alternate solution that protects both staff and customers. User-generated credentials are one of the most significant challenges for security, with illegal credentials being used in 61% of data breaches.


Passwordless authentication refers to any form of secure access that does not rely on a static passcode or a knowledge-based secret. Other authentication elements – such as an ownership factor or a biometric element (e.g. a fingerprint or facial scan) – are used to prove a user's identity. Since there are no passwords to be disclosed or intercepted, passwordless login drastically decreases the chances of attack.


Password-free authentication will aid in improving both security and user experience for all enterprises. In terms of security, not typing a password makes it more difficult for a potential fraudster to obtain credentials as it isn't stored in memory or written on a sticky note.
Increased security
Passwords are vulnerable to a wide range of assaults. They also cause tension and make people's lives difficult. Nobody wants to go to the trouble of making up a multi-letter, multi-number combination. Passwords of this type are easy to remember, as well as easy to guess, steal and crack. Passwords add to the administrative burden. According to Forrester Research, large organisations spend up to $1 million each year on password reset help desk interventions.

Passwordless authentication lowers account takeover fraud and social engineering. As there are no credentials that can be used to lure or compromise the other person, the risk of being a victim of phishing or account takeover assaults is significantly decreased.
Enriched user experience
A password-free login method will improve the user experience. Employees and customers can use solutions that do not require them to memorise or type in complex passwords. To ensure a seamless user experience, biometric authentication alternatives such as fingerprint or facial scanning can be used to eliminate password fatigue.
Resource optimisation
Password management consumes a lot of resources for enterprises. Passwordless access allows an organisation to cut expenses related to password recovery and monitoring. Furthermore, a corporation can lower the chance of a data breach by increasing its security and minimising attack risks, both of which come at a hefty expense.


Passwords are the simplest way for an intruder to get access to the network or damage an account. Thus, data breaches will be significantly less likely without them. Identity fraud is also less likely because stealing a physical device or intercepting a one-time passcode or biometric identification involves a significant amount of work. Cybercriminals enjoy tasks that require little effort, such as cracking user passwords.

Once an organisation decides to phase out passwords, after considering all the advantages of passwordless authentication, what comes next?
Gaining freedom
The very first step is to centralise user authentication, often known as single sign-on. Then, for an extra layer of security, multi-factor authentication should be added, as this is the most effective way for businesses to defend themselves against an attack. Having the authentication layer in place, companies can gradually phase out passwords by incorporating features like risk scoring and passwordless login in a different manner.


Here, it’s advisable to set up a platform that allows certificate-based authentication, and ensure secure holding and management of certificates related to a given user and device. It is important to develop a security intelligence tool that looks for anomalous/malicious occurrences in the authentication log data.

From a security standpoint, a certificate-based passwordless method is significantly more secure than utilising regular credentials. With the certificate, there is an effective device identity in place as well, irreversibly tying the person and the gadget. It’s even better if a unified endpoint management (UEM) or mobile device management (MDM) platform is deployed – this will certainly lead to increased confidence in the security of devices that are not controlled or managed.
The future of passwords
Businesses will continue to use passwords for a little longer, but their use and utility will go down over time. There are myriad new tools for user identification in the offing that are safer than passwords. Over time, passwords could probably end up being used for second-level security – which is good to have – and would no longer be the only way to identify users. It will eventually be pushed into the background and find use only as a backup.



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