ChatGPT mixes up Japan's digital transformation minister with the country's prime minister, report says

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ChatGPT mixes up Japan's digital transformation minister with the country's prime minister, report says
Taro Kono attends a news conference in Tokyo in 2015.REUTERS/Issei Kato
  • ChatGPT mixed up Japan's digital transformation minister with the country's prime minister.
  • During an interview with Bloomberg, Taro Kono said people needed to be careful when using the bot.
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Japan's digital transformation minister, Taro Kono, says ChatGPT mixed him up with the country's prime minister.

Kono made the comments in an interview with Bloomberg. He said he asked ChatGPT who he was and the chatbot came back with the wrong answer. "So you need to be careful," he added.

Japan's prime minister has been Fumio Kishida since 2021. Kono has never been the prime minister but was once seen as a favorite in the 2021 leadership race.

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AI-powered products like OpenAI's chatbot are prone to making mistakes, a point of concern for some AI experts. The chatbots are powered by large language models, which are prone to "hallucinating" and can deliver incorrect answers to queries with a sophistication that makes them appear correct.

Since its launch, ChatGPT has caused frustration among professionals in a number of sectors. Some college professors, for example, have raised concerns about the technology and say they've already caught students trying to pass off AI-generated content as their own.

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Misinformation is another key concern. As tech companies rush to incorporate the advanced technology into search and other publically available products, experts and commentators continue to raise the alarm about the risks of spreading misinformation.

Kono is advocating for the use of the technology in Japan, citing the country's shrinking population. "Robots are not a threat to the labor force in Japan," he told Bloomberg. "We are more eager to try new AI technologies."

Representatives for the Prime Minister's Office of Japan did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment, made outside normal working hours.

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