Google is asking a group of employees to work without internet to curb cyberattacks, report says

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Google is asking a group of employees to work without internet to curb cyberattacks, report says
Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images
  • According to CNBC, Google is starting a pilot program that turns off internet access for some staff.
  • It initially selected 2,500 employees, but they can now opt-out and others can volunteer.
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Google starts a pilot program on Wednesday that will restrict the internet access of a group of its employees, CNBC reported.

These staff will have to use computers where the internet has been disabled, except for internal tools and Google sites like Drive or Gmail, per CNBC.

Some of these employees will also be prohibited from installing new software on the computers.

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Internal company documents viewed by CNBC say that some exceptions will be made for those Googlers who need the internet to do their job.

The outlet reports that while Google initially selected 2,500 people to take part in the scheme, they've since been allowed to opt out and others can volunteer.

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The pilot program appears to be taking place because Google is concerned about the risk of cyberattacks.

"Googlers are frequent targets of attacks," read one internal description seen by CNBC. It added that turning off most internet access prevents attackers from running code or stealing internal data.

Google is likely to be more concerned about security as it pursues US government contracts, with last year's announcement of a new division called Google Public Sector.

And last week, Microsoft announced that hackers based in China targeted customer emails including those used by government agencies.

JPMorgan has also spoken about an increased risk of cyberattacks, increasing its spending on security, Insider reported in May.

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Google did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment.

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