YouTube finally deleted notorious conspiracy theorist David Icke's channel after he spread COVID-19 misinformation

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YouTube finally deleted notorious conspiracy theorist David Icke's channel after he spread COVID-19 misinformation
Conspiracy theorist David Icke in 2008Anna Gowthorpe - PA Images/PA Images via Getty Images
  • YouTube has finally deleted notorious conspiracy theorist David Icke's official channel, having repeatedly warned him not to violate its policies.
  • "YouTube has clear policies prohibiting any content that disputes the existence and transmission of Covid-19 as described by the WHO and the NHS," a YouTube spokeswoman told BBC News.
  • Icke – whose YouTube channel had close to 1 million subscribers at the time of its deletion – baselessly linked COVID-19 symptoms and 5G mobile networks.
  • YouTube will still allow third-party content featuring Icke to remain on its platform.
  • YouTube did not immediately respond to Business Insider's request for comment.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.
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YouTube has finally deleted conspiracy theorist David Icke's official channel, having repeatedly warned him not to violate its policies.

We first saw the news via the BBC.

"YouTube has clear policies prohibiting any content that disputes the existence and transmission of Covid-19 as described by the WHO and the NHS," a YouTube spokeswoman told BBC News.

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Icke has spread misinformation for years via social and traditional media, and his YouTube channel had close to 1 million subscribers at the time of its deletion. The straw that broke the camel's back seems to have been Icke baselessly linking COVID-19 symptoms to 5G mobile networks, in violation of YouTube's policies.

The 68-year-old has been an active conspiracy theorist for over two decades. Among other controversial views, he disputes accepted explanations regarding the cause of the 9/11 attacks. In 2018, Business Insider discovered that YouTube was pushing Icke's conspiracy theories to kids via its YouTube Kids app.

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But his mainstream social media presence looks to be crumbling fast after Facebook removed his official page from its platform earlier this month.

The baseless notion that COVID-19 is caused by 5G mobile networks has gained traction internationally, with multiple phone masts across the UK – Icke's home country – being subjected to acts of vandalism in recent weeks.

YouTube will still allow third-party content featuring Icke to remain on its platform.

YouTube did not immediately respond to Business Insider's request for comment.

Read the original article on Business Insider
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