The Electoral commission dismisses claims the Remain campaign broke electoral law

Priti Patel

Reuters

Priti Patel

LONDON - The official elections watchdog has rejected two claims by former Conservative minister Priti Patel that the official Remain campaign broke electoral law.

In a statement, the Electoral Commision dismissed claims by Patel that the Britain Stronger in Europe campaign had been guilty of "joint working" with other Remain campaign groups.

They also declined to open an investigation into whether the campaign had a "common plan" with other campaign groups, saying there was not sufficient evidence to justify a full investigation.
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"It was alleged that five campaigners were set up by BSIE and acted under a common plan," a spokesperson for the Electoral Commission said.

"The Commission has not been provided with, or found evidence for an investigation to be opened.

"Separately, the Commission has previously concluded that extracts from two books published since the referendum that describe daily telephone meetings of certain 'remain' campaigners and chaired by BSIE did not meet the threshold for an investigation to be opened. Evidence indicates that the meetings were advisory and did not involve or result in decisions on referendum spending."
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The Commission also dismissed allegations that the Democratic Unionist Party had broken electoral law by engaging in "joint spending" with other organisations campaigning for Brexit.

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