The Southwest plane that blew an engine causing one woman to die could be put back into operation

Southwest Airline crashThe engine on a Southwest Airlines plane is inspected as it sits on the runway at the Philadelphia International Airport after it made an emergency landing in Philadelphia, Tuesday, April 17, 2018.Amanda Bourman/AP

  • The Southwest Airlines Boeing 737-700 that was involved in a fatal emergency landing in April was flown to Victorville, California, for storage on Thursday.
  • A Southwest representative told Business Insider that the airline has not decided whether the aircraft will return to service.
  • The plane was flown from Everett, Washington, where it had been held since April 30, according to The Points Guy.


The Southwest Airlines Boeing 737-700 that was involved in a fatal emergency landing in April was flown to Victorville, California, for storage on Thursday.

The plane was flown from Everett, Washington, where it had been held since April 30, according to The Points Guy. A Southwest representative was not able to confirm the amount of time the plane had spent in Everett and told Business Insider that the airline has not decided whether the aircraft will return to service. The representative said the airline temporarily stored Boeing 737-300s in Victorville after they were retired last year.

On April 17, Flight 1380 made an emergency landing in Philadelphia after an engine exploded and blew out a window. One passenger was nearly sucked out of the window and later died, while seven people were injured. The passenger who was killed was identified as Jennifer Riordan, 43.

National Transportation Safety Board chairman Robert Sumwalt said the death was the first in a US passenger airline accident in over nine years. Before April, the most recent fatal accident came in February 2009 near Buffalo, New York, when an aircraft operated by the now-defunct regional airline Colgan Air crashed. Fifty people were killed in that crash - 49 people on the plane and one person on the ground.

The NTSB sent a team to Philadelphia to investigate the crash in April. The agency said a full investigation would take 12-15 months

On Monday, Southwest said it expected a 3% decrease in second-quarter revenue from the same period last year due to a drop in bookings. The airline said it had scaled back marketing since the incident.

Read More about the Southwest Incident:

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