SBI warns customers to beware of WhatsApp calls and scam messages

SBI warns customers of fraudulent calls and messages over WhatsappBCCL
  • The State Bank of India (SBI) has warned its customers to beware of scam calls and messages on WhatsApp.
  • Back actors are offering up lottery winnings or customer gift offers to try and lure customers into revealing their bank details.
  • “Cybercriminals are waiting for just one mistake,” said the advisory.
India’s largest public sector bank, the State Bank of India (SBI), issued a warning to its customer to remain wary of calls and messages on WhatsApp.


Scamsters are using fake lottery schemes or customer gift offers to try and obtain account information.

“Cybercriminals are waiting for just one mistake — please do not trust such fake callers or forwarded messages,” said the advisory.
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This isn't the first warning that the banking behemoth has issued. Earlier this month, SBI also asked customers to be on the lookout for fraudulent phishing emails.

As more people shift to digital payments to maintain contact-less during the coronavirus pandemic, there has been a surge in cyber threats — especially in the digital finance space.

SBI’s policy is to fully compensate for any fraud that takes place due to the bank's fault. However, in case the loss is due to the customer's negligence, they will not get a refund.
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Here’s how protect yourself from banking scams on WhatsApp:
  • Be aware that SBI never calls or asks for personal or account specific information through WhatsApp or emails.
  • There are no lottery schemes or lucky customer gift offers going on.
  • Don’t share banking information over WhatsApp messages or calls under any circumstances.
  • Keep your ATM PIN and other sensitive details only to yourself.
  • Double check the URL before clicking on it to make sure it’s the official ID. Better yet, type in the bank’s official URL into the address bar yourself.
  • Make sure you have a strong password on your net banking account.
  • Make sure your device and browser are up to date.
  • Don’t log in using public Wi-Fi.
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