Indians are expressly downbeat about their work and find it ‘socially useless’, says study

Read full story
(Photo Source: Reuters)

  • A recent study has shown that over 12% Indians perceive their job as ‘socially useless’ and counterproductive.
  • Over 50% of socially useless jobs are taken by those who perceive it important to have socially useful jobs.
  • The study revealed that 8% of the world’s workers considered their jobs futile, along with 17% of the lot questioning the effectiveness of their jobs.
Is your job ‘socially useless’? A new study by Robert Dur of Erasmus University Rotterdam and Max van Lent of Leiden University revealed the world’s population is expressly downbeat regarding their work.

Particularly, over 12% Indians perceive their job ‘socially useless’ and counterproductive — this, apparently, is the highest across the globe behind Poland, Japan and Israel, says the study.

The study was conducted across 47 countries, which integrated and surveyed data from more than 100,000 workers. It found that 8% of the world’s workers considered their jobs futile, along with 17% of the lot questioning the effectiveness of their jobs.

The assessment of ‘socially useless’ was based on responses from working class people who strongly disagree with the statement, “My job is useful to the society.”

Interestingly, more private sector employees report having a socially useless job in comparison to that of public sector — including occupations such as teachers, health workers and police officers. While 11% of the ones employed in private business who consider their work useless involve finance, sales, marketing and public relations department.

However, not all workers manage to get a job they consider socially useful. Over 50% of socially useless jobs are taken by those who perceive it important to have socially useful job.

Apparently, bad managers and strict job law enforcement has risen ‘socially useless jobs’ since the nature of jobs and job creation is mainly performed by managers.

While, strict legislation retains workers but changing market circumstances leave them with little work to do.

SEE ALSO:

India ranked as the most vacation-deprived country in the world: Survey

Judging employees on results could reward luck over skill, argue top psychologists, and there's a better way to do it

13 ways you can be happier at work, according to career experts
{{}}
Add Comment()

Comments ()

X
Sort By:
Be the first one to comment.
We have sent you a verification email. This comment will be published once verification is done.