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How a giant pharma company and a little-known biotech teamed up to create the first coronavirus vaccine

Lydia Ramsey Pflanzer   

How a giant pharma company and a little-known biotech teamed up to create the first coronavirus vaccine

Hello,

Phew, what a way to start the week. We on the healthcare desk have been spending most of our waking hours thinking of all the implications of Pfizer's announcement that its vaccine works at preventing COVID-19.

It was my first day waking up in Mountain Time (I've landed in Denver!), and let me tell you, I'm hoping there won't be too many more 4:30 a.m. days in my future.

Today in healthcare news: 7 things to know about yesterday's vaccine news, health insurers are forming new types of health plans that makes it cheaper for patients to see doctors online, and why a top infectious disease expert thinks it's too early to celebrate a vaccine win just yet.

Plus: on Monday, the Food and Drug Administration gave an emergency authorization to Eli Lilly's COVID-19 antibody drug treatment, now titled "bamlanivimab," a name that seemed to spark some good jokes on Twitter.

How the pharma giant Pfizer teamed up with a little-known biotech to develop an effective coronavirus vaccine in record time

Read the full story from Andrew Dunn here>>

Health insurers are creating a new kind of plan that makes it cheaper for patients to see doctors online, and it shows how the pandemic is reshaping the future of healthcare

Read the full story from Shelby Livingston here>>

Why a top infectious-disease expert says it's too soon to celebrate Pfizer's coronavirus vaccine

  • Pfizer's coronavirus-vaccine candidate succeeded in the last stage of clinical trials, the New York drugmaker said Monday.
  • While Pfizer said the results showed its vaccine was more than 90% effective at preventing COVID-19, the company did not release data from the interim analysis.
  • William Haseltine, a longtime biotech executive and infectious-disease expert, told Business Insider that while this was "very welcome news," he also wanted to see the data.
  • "There are many, many outstanding questions which are left unanswered," Haseltine said.

Read the full story from Andrew Dunn here>>

More stories we're reading:

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- Lydia

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