Gas stoves create more nanoparticle pollution than a busy street with diesel and gas cars, study finds

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Gas stoves create more nanoparticle pollution than a busy street with diesel and gas cars, study finds
A recent study suggests that cooking with gas stoves poses a significant health risk due to the emission of harmful nanoparticles. These nanoparticles, significantly smaller than the width of a human hair, are easily inhaled and can bypass the body's natural defenses, potentially reaching deep into the respiratory system and other organs.
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The study's findings reveal that gas stove emissions can be 10 to 100 times higher in concentration than nanocluster aerosols found in car exhaust fumes on busy streets. This raises concerns, as these nanoparticles are linked to an increased risk of developing asthma and other respiratory illnesses.

The research team, led by Professor Nusrat Jung, measured the emission of nanocluster aerosols during various cooking activities, including boiling water and grilling sandwiches. Their findings showed that even short cooking periods released trillions of these nanoparticles into the air, potentially impacting the entire household.

While the study doesn't advocate for drastic measures like switching to historical steam appliances, it highlights the importance of using kitchen exhaust fans while cooking with gas stoves. Ideally, these fans should automatically activate to effectively remove harmful nanoparticles from the indoor environment.

However, further research is needed to determine the exact effectiveness of exhaust fans in mitigating nanoparticle exposure. Additionally, the researchers call for recognising nanocluster aerosols as a distinct category of air pollutants in future regulations, emphasising the need for stricter controls to safeguard indoor air quality.

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The findings of this research have been published in PNAS Nexus.
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