More than a third of India’s engineers are unemployable, and 20% lack coding skills

BCCL

  • According to a recent survey by BridgeLabz, more than one-third of the engineering students lack the skills to be considered employable.
  • One in five of them are employed in non-core jobs, that is on-technical job roles.
  • Almost 4% are a force fit in the emerging technologies like data science and machine learning.
  • The survey highlights that the biggest roadblock to employment for engineers is under-confidence while applying for jobs.
Engineering graduates in India still lag on the employability front. More than one-third of the engineering students lack the skills to be considered employable, according to a recent survey by BridgeLabz.

While 20% of the engineering applicants did not have adequate coding skills, roughly 30% failed to qualify the aptitude test. As a result, one in five engineers are employed in non-core jobs or non-technical jobs.

Almost 4% are a force fit in the emerging technology roles like data science and machine learning.
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The survey highlights that the biggest roadblock to employment for engineers is lack of confidence while applying for jobs. Young engineers lack it primarily due to lack of practical exposure and project-oriented learning. Theoretical concepts are not materialised with practical implementation. Live projects and hands-on experience can solve the challenges to employment in engineering space, the survey said.

“We are actively working towards expanding our operations, with an aim to make 3,000 engineers employable in emerging tech within the coming year,” said Narayan Mahadevan, Founder, BridgeLabz.

BridgeLabz is an incubation lab focused to furnish engineers in emerging technologies. The survey analysed over 1100 engineers in India.
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See also:
Learn or leave — tech majors are either reskilling employees or slashing jobs

India will need 2.7 million digitally-skilled people by 2023 across sectors, not just in IT

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Soft skills can save your job from the machines but young professionals are severely short of it
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