Carry Minati's 'YouTube vs TikTok' video removed for violating terms of service — fans claim injustice

Indian YouTuber Carry Minati's YouTube vs TikTok - The End video was taken down from YouTubeBye Pewdiepie/Carryminati/YouTube

  • Indian YouTuber Carry Minati’s roast video, which went viral last week has been removed from Google’s video streaming platform
  • YouTube says the video has been removed for violating the platform’s terms of service.
  • Fans are expressing their outrage on Twitter with the narrative centred around the YouTube vs TikTok feud, which has escalated during the coronavirus lockdown.
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Carry Minati, the 20-year old YouTube sensation with over 16 million subscribers, can’t be happy that his most viral video till date, YouTube vs TikTok — The End, was removed from the platform for violating its ‘ terms of service’.

Carry Minati's viral video, YouTube vs TikTok - The End, was taken down by Google's video streaming platformYouTube screenshot/BI India

His fans definitely aren’t happy that Google’s video streaming service chose to remove Minati’s most viral video till date — garnering nearly 70 million views in under a week and doubling his subscriber base from 8 million — with #CarryMinati and #JusticeForCarry showing up as the two top trends on Twitter.

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In YouTube’s defence, it updated its harassment policy in December 2019 stating, “We will not tolerate harassment.” And, Carry Minati’s YouTube video was a pretty targetted attack at TikTok’s self-proclaimed social influencer Amir Siddiqui — dismantling Siddiqui’s video line-by-line. “We have strict policies that prohibit harassment on YouTube, including using malicious insults based on intrinsic attributes such as sexual orientation. We quickly remove content that violates these policies when flagged by our users,” YouTube told Business Insider in response to the incident.

Even though Minati’s whole IP on YouTube is reacting and roasting popular TV shows or celebrities, this is the first time that he posted a video roasting a single individual. Something that he himself confessed in the YouTube vs TikTok - The End video. The ongoing feud between YouTube and TikTok has only escalated during the lockdown as more content floods the system, and creators are caught in a battle of formats.

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Carry MinatiNot a Daring Show ft. Wakar Zaqa/ Carry Minati/YouTube

If you didn’t have a chance to watch the video at the centre of the controversy before it was taken down, here are the highlights:

  • Minati pointed out that TikTok videos don’t have any quality and are way shorter than YouTube videos. Even though creators have the option to create one-minute videos, they normally choose to make multiple 30-second clips instead to bump up their content count.
  • Siddiqui’s video alleges that YouTubers only make content for sympathy. Minati hit back with a video that Siddiqui does that in more obvious ways by posting videos of him feeding poor kids.
  • In multiple points in the video, Minati highlights Siddiqui’s slip-ups in grammar as he talks hinting how his education is inadequate.
  • He also shows that Siddiqui’s claim of being a “social influencer” involves using crowdsourcing hashtags on Instagram in order to get more views, even though they may not have any relevance to the image shared. As an example, he shared a picture of Siddiqui standing next to a car and one the hashtags on the post was ‘#Skirt’.
Who is Carry Minati?
For those of you unfamiliar with Carry Minati, he’s been making videos since 2010 and even won the coveted ‘Golden Play Button’ in 2017 when he crossed 1 million subscribers. His real name is Ajey Nagar and he hails from Faridabad, Haryana.

Carry Minati is a 20 year YouTuber who hails from Faridabad in HaryanaBye PewDiePie/Carry Minati/YouTube

Before becoming the ‘ The Roast King of India’, the first video of his to see significant fame was a collaboration with fellow YouTuber Bhuvan Bham called Making Money Money with BB Ki Vines. He’s also the same guy who made a diss track called Bye Bye PewDiePie, which ironically wasn’t taken down for ‘bullying’ or ‘harassment’.
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He has a second channel called CarryisLIve, where posts live streams of him playing games — not unlike PewDiePie’s claim to fame.

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