Facebook and Salesforce are teaming up against Microsoft Office and Google

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Quip co-founder Bret Taylor, a former Facebook CTO, poses for a photograph at the company's Market Street headquarters in San Francisco, California March 12, 2014. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith Thomson Reuters Bret Taylor, Quip's founder, who is also Facebook's former chief technology officer. This picture was taken years before he sold his productivity app to Salesforce for $750 million.

  • Salesforce is integrating Quip, its productivity app, with Workplace by Facebook, a private version of the company's social networking site that's designed businesses.
  • Salesforce bought Quip for $750 million in 2016 to build up a rival to Microsoft Office and Google G Suite. Quip founder Bret Taylor is Facebook's former chief technology officer.
  • The deal will give each company access to the others' customers, which could help in the battle to unseat Microsoft Office.

Salesforce and Facebook are teaming up to take on both Microsoft and Google in business software.

The cloud-software provider and the social networking giant are expected to announce Tuesday that they are integrating Salesforce's Quip productivity app with Facebook's Workplace , which is a version of the company's social network that was designed specifically for businesses. The collaboration is designed to make it easier to share Quip documents in Workplace and see there a list of all documents shared.

The partnership could help the two companies better compete with Microsoft's Office and Google's G Suite.

But the deal could have other benefits. The partnership will give both Salesforce and Facebook a way in with each other's customers.

Quip already integrates tightly with Salesforce's core customer management and marketing software. By making it easier to use Quip in Workplace, the deal could make Facebook's service more enticing to Salesforce customers.

Meanwhile, Workplace customers who give Quip a whirl will get an easy on-ramp to the wider world of Salesforce.

That kind of cross-selling will likely be important to the future viability of both Quip and Workplace.

Salesforce bought Quip last year for $750 million. At the time, Bret Taylor, who founded Quip and formerly served as Facebook's chief technology officer, said the deal would be a huge boon for selling to businesses .

While lucrative, the business market can be tricky for a new player to crack without the support of a major player like Salesforce, because businesses tend to stick with established partners. That dynamic is a big part of why Microsoft Office has remained entrenched as the workplace standard - it's the safe, known choice for businesses to buy.

Workplace has seen some early momentum, with 30,000 organizations signed on and counting . But it has a long way to go to be a serious rival to Microsoft Office or Google's G Suite. Partnering up with Salesforce could give Workplace a little extra clout with enterprises.

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