The best glamping vacations in the US

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The best glamping vacations in the US

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  • If falling asleep on the ground in a sleeping bag doesn't sound appealing but you still want to feel more connected to nature, glamping offers the ideal compromise.
  • From tipis and safari tents to treehouses and airstreams, these unique spots across the US promise comfy beds and picturesque views just out the windows or tent flaps.
  • We've found accommodations to suit every budget, from wallet-friendly tipis with the basics to splurge-worthy camps on picturesque ranches that pull out all the stops.
  • Read all Business Insider travel reviews here.

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Let's face it ⁠— camping isn't for everyone. If backpacking with all your food, pitching a tent, and sleeping on the ground while fighting off bugs just doesn't sound appealing, that doesn't mean you can't enjoy a vacation focused on unplugging and connecting with nature.

Glamping is the ideal compromise since it infuses a strong dose of, you guessed it, glam factor into camping accommodations. It enables guests to sleep in comfy beds while still enjoying a taste of the great outdoors. However, if more traditional camping does sound preferable, this comprehensive packing list will help get you started.

Glamping has grown in popularity with available accommodations now going far beyond a simple tent with an actual bed. Choose from singular accommodations like airstreams, vintage trailers, treehouses, star gazing domes, and more. Even those that are the more traditional tent experience often come with perks like air conditioning, stylish hotel-like decor, or roomy one- and two-bedroom options with private ensuite bathrooms.

Now, more than ever, may be an ideal time to try out glamping since many spots are in secluded areas or private cabins and tents that make social distancing easier than at traditional hotels. Plus, all of these camps are located in the US and many are just a short distance from major cities, making them easy to reach by car, which experts are saying is a relatively safe travel option. Though, as always, we recommend following guidance from the CDC and WHO when it comes to traveling and practicing effective social distancing.

Looking for more easy getaways in the US?

We've combed through hundreds of options across the US to find a range of unique glamping options to fit every budget. Our top places are based on our own travel experiences, as well as reviews from trusted websites like Trip Advisor and Booking.com. Whether you're looking for a wallet-friendly tipi, a Scandanavian-inspired A-frame cabin in the Catskills, or a posh tent that rivals a five-star hotel that includes food and alcohol, there's a glamping spot to suit your tastes.

These are the best glamping vacation spots in the US. Read the original article on Business Insider

The Resort at Paws Up - Greenough, Montana

The Resort at Paws Up - Greenough, Montana
Paws Up
Book The Resort at Paws Up starting at $1,250 per night

Nowhere does glamping quite like the famed Resort at Paws Up, as evidenced by the fact that a stay here includes a camping butler. The 37,000-acre ranch features untamed Montana wilderness steeped in Lewis & Clark history, situated along 10 miles of the idyllic Blackfoot River. There are more than 100 miles of designated hiking, mountain biking, horse, and ATV trails.

There are 28 cabin homes open year-round, and 36 glamping tents open seasonally in warmer months. Each cabin or tent is individually decorated in Western-chic style with furnishings and artwork hand-curated by the owners. The tents are no ordinary, snug stay. Many feature one or two bedrooms, ensuite bathrooms, and clawfoot soaking tubs. Guests choose their camp based on their tastes, opting for river views, cliffside stays, or more secluded areas.

Pros: Set on a 37,000-acre ranch in Montana, the stunning resort offers year-round cabin homes and luxurious, roomy tents seasonally.

Cons: While alcohol is technically part of the nightly rate, it is only included during designated times such as lunch, dinner, and happy hour. Drinks outside of those times come at an extra cost. Additionally, guided activities like hot air balloon rides or cattle drives are also not included in the expensive price.

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Dunton Hot Springs - Dolores, Colorado

Dunton Hot Springs - Dolores, Colorado
Dunton Hot Springs
Book Dunton Hot Springs starting at $1,025 per night

Dunton Hot Springs is an adventure haven located just across the mountain from Telluride. This outdoor getaway offers an array of exciting outdoor adventures, wellness-focused activities, fine dining, and unique events. In the summer, enjoy a scenic horseback ride, try fly fishing on an exclusive nine-mile stretch of the West Fork of the Dolores, or head out on hiking or mountain biking trails that range from easy to heart pounding. Dunton can also provide expert guides to help you summit nearby 14,000-foot peaks or take guests rock climbing.

Choose between traditional indoor cabins or glamping tents at the Dunton River Camp, located four miles down the road from the main property. The eight opulent tents offer modern amenities in the midst of nature, complete with en-suite bathrooms with six-foot soaking tubs. Each tent comes with two complimentary mountain bikes for exploring the grounds and trails.

Pros: An outdoor paradise for families and couples alike offering both cabins and opulent tents as accommodations.

Cons: Due to the novel coronavirus, Dunton River Camp is currently only accepting private bookings for the summer season to ensure safe social distancing.

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Best Resorts sub banners Luxury

Best Resorts sub banners Luxury
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These camps put the glam in glamping. You'll feel more like you're at a five-star hotel than out in the backwoods. While they come with a hefty price tag, no detail is overlooked, from large tents with sumptuous bedding to unrivaled activities and cuisine, ensuring a splurge-worthy vacation. Plus, both spots include all meals, drinks, and many of the offered activities included in the nightly price.

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Collective Governors Island - Governors Island, New York

Collective Governors Island - Governors Island, New York
Trip Advisor
Book Collective Governors Island starting at $413 per night

When you think of camping or glamping, overlooking skyscrapers probably isn't what comes to mind. But at this Governors Island luxury camping retreat, the iconic New York skyline and the Statue of Liberty are both backdrops. A short private water taxi ride from downtown Manhattan or Brooklyn drops guests off at a pastoral haven.

Journey Tents feature Queen or Twin-sized beds with 1,000 thread-count linens, down comforters, and designer blankets. There's air conditioning in every tent so muggy New York nights won't prevent you from getting a great night's sleep. While the standard Journey Tents come with shared bathrooms, you can upgrade to a Summit Tent for a private en-suite bathroom, along with an exclusive minibar curated by The Goods Mart.

In the morning, wake up to a complimentary in-tent continental breakfast before opting to tackle the many activities offered from a harbor tour to lawn games to a massage. You can also explore the island by renting bikes at an additional fee.

Pros: A high-end glamping retreat overlooking New York City. Tents come with air conditioning and breakfast is included.

Cons: The tents are expensive and even the cheapest doesn't include a private bathroom. Plus, they are all located right near one another, so if you're looking for a secluded or private stay, this isn't the place.

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Terra Glamping - East Hampton, New York

Terra Glamping - East Hampton, New York
Terra Glamping
Book Terra Glamping starting at $300 per night

The romantic waterfront tents at Terra Glamping include 30 safari-style tents that overlook the bay to Sag Harbor and Shelter Island. Each tent features a porch for stargazing, a comfy Queen memory foam mattress, down bedding, and stylish furniture that varies from tent to tent.

The site also makes it easy to unplug and offers plenty of activities in lounge tents fully stocked with games, books, and cards, while the dining and grilling area is a casual place to mingle with other guests over dinner. A continental breakfast is served each morning with pour-over coffee, fresh local pastries, fruit, and more. There are also nightly campfire s'mores, complimentary kayaks, and stand up paddleboards for guests.

Pros: A waterfront spot with sleek tents furnished to feel like hotel rooms just a short drive from some of the best offerings in the Hamptons.

Cons: While there is cell service, there's no Wi-Fi on the premises, which can be nice for unplugging but a hassle if you want to stay connected.

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Asheville Glamping - Asheville, North Carolina

Asheville Glamping - Asheville, North Carolina
Ashville Glamping
Book Asheville Glamping starting at $295 per night

Sleep under the stars in a dome with Asheville Glamping. The plastic domes come in different sizes and offer different amenities, but for a roomier option, try Dome 4, also called the Star Gazing Dome. It includes a Queen-sized memory foam bed with a constellation identification book to watch for shooting stars. The dome also comes with a private outdoor hot tub.

Ashville Glamping also offers bell tents, safari tents, airstreams, treehouses, and the Nest, an adults-only cabin perched in the trees and accessible only via two suspension bridges.

Pros: A glamping spot with a range of accommodation types including domes, tents, and treehouses.

Cons: The most popular accommodations book up quickly during the summer, so you'll need to plan at least five months in advance if you have your heart set on a specific dome or tent.

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Eastwind Hotel & Bar - Windham, New York

Eastwind Hotel & Bar - Windham, New York
Eastwind Hotel & Bar
Book Eastwind Hotel & Bar starting at $259 per night

While this peaceful spot tucked in the Catskills is a standard hotel with regular rooms, they also offer a glamping option. Lushna cabins are based on Scandanavian notions, embracing the popular idea of hygge with simple but cozy aesthetics. Snuggle up in a small A-frame cabin and take in the mountain scenery without ever leaving the Queen-sized beds pushed right up against the scenery, outfitted with luxurious Frette linens and Faribault wool blankets.

The cabins are small at just 220 square feet, but they do come with private bathrooms and nearby circular wooden saunas. Barbeque kits are provided upon request to complete the camping experience. If you get tired of hanging out in your A-frame, wander over to High Spirit, the hotel's chic cocktail lounge, for a smoky ginger Mezcal Paloma and light bites.

Pros: A chic hotel in the Catskills that offers small A-frame cabins as a glamping option.

Cons: The cabins are snug, with Queen-size beds taking up nearly all of the bedroom space.

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Best Destinations Good Value banner

Best Destinations Good Value banner
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These destinations offer upscale perks and amenities, whether it's stylish hotel-like interiors, air-conditioned tents, or a private hot tub to enjoy under the stars. Those little extras can make all the difference in a stay, making these accommodations an excellent value for the price.

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Under Canvas Mount Rushmore - Keystone, South Dakota

Under Canvas Mount Rushmore - Keystone, South Dakota
Under Canvas Mount Rushmore
Book Under Canvas Mount Rushmore starting at $184 per night

Imagine waking up to the smell of Ponderosa pines and juniper in the Black Hills of South Dakota, after a night spent cozied up in sumptuous sheets, and pulling back your tent flap to stunning views of Mount Rushmore. You can do just that at one of Under Canvas's newest locations.

All of the Under Canvas tent options feature King-size beds, private bathrooms that include upscale bath amenities, private decks, and wood-burning stoves. Deluxe and Stargazer tents are ideal for couples, while the Suites sleep up to four people and are a great choice for families.

Additional camp amenities include complimentary activities, guided nature walks, and communal fire pits. Food costs are additional, but well worth the extra spend since offerings go far beyond the usual camp burritos. The menu features homemade seasonal fare using locally-sourced ingredients, like pan-roasted trout and mini pulled pork tacos.

Pros: Canvas tents with private in-tent bathrooms and stunning views of Mount Rushmore feel like an upscale hotel.

Cons: While the camp is open in September, mornings and nights during that time can be quite chilly and the woodburning stoves aren't always adequate heating.

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The Trailer Pond - Adelaide, California

The Trailer Pond - Adelaide, California
The Trailer Pond
Book The Trailer Pond starting at $175 per night

Make your next wine-fueled getaway in one of these cute, colorful vintage trailers. Ideal for a girls' getaway or a bachelor or bachelorette party, these Tinker Tin trailers are found on 130-acres of organically farmed vineyards in Paso Robles, California. Book the trailers individually or reserve the entire area and all five trailers for a private group stay.

The funky trailers are from the 1950s and come in canary yellow, turquoise, hot pink, and lime green. Many feature original touches from flooring to countertops for an authentic vintage vibe. All come with just one double bed, so even a couple might find it a bit snug. However, booth-style dining tables and mini kitchens make for a fun stay.

In addition to taking in the scenic vineyard views and lounging by the pond with a glass of wine, for an additional fee you can book yoga, wine tasting tours, massages, or private tasting classes.

Pros: Funky and fun vintage trailers from the 1950s found on a 130-acre vineyard in wine country.

Cons: The trailers don't have private bathrooms in them. Instead, there's a communal, fully plumbed bathroom with an outdoor shower, sink, and vanity.

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AutoCamp Cape Cod - Cape Cod, Massachusetts

AutoCamp Cape Cod - Cape Cod, Massachusetts
Trip Advisor
Book AutoCamp Cape Cod starting at $139 per night

Take car camping to a whole new level on your next beach trip. As the name implies, AutoCamp offers stylishly-outfitted airstreams as accommodations. The luxurious airstreams pull out all the stops when it comes to amenities, from Queen-sized Tempur-Pedic mattresses with plush linens and flat screen TVs, to spa-inspired private bathrooms and small kitchens. Each one includes a private deck with an outdoor dining area and a fire pit with a grill.

AutoCamp also offers luxury tents, as well as cabin-like X Suites that are fully ADA accessible. No matter which option you choose, the chic interiors, curated food and beverage offerings, complimentary coffee and tea, and weekly activities like yoga and beer tastings are sure to elevate your experience.

Pros: Choose from thoughtfully designed airstreams, tents, or ADA-accessible X Suites, all within five minutes of local shops, restaurants, and historic sights in Cape Cod.

Cons: The site isn't right on the beach so you won't be waking up to ocean views.

Read our guide to the best hotels in Cape Cod
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Cody Wyoming Trout Ranch - Cody, Wyoming

Cody Wyoming Trout Ranch - Cody, Wyoming
Trip Advisor
Book Cody Wyoming Trout Ranch starting at $129 per night

If sleeping in a cozy tipi on the edge of the idyllic Shoshone River sounds like your idea of heaven, visit Cody Wyoming Trout Ranch. Their glamping tipis are spacious, 20 feet in diameter, and come fully furnished with beds, couches, and chairs, all decked out with colorful Native American-inspired prints.

The ranch is an hour's drive from Yellowstone, making it easy to enjoy the picturesque National Park. The site also features campfire pits, picnic tables, and a community fire pit ideal for making s'mores. True to glamping fashion, you won't have to totally rough it; there are laundry facilities, shared bathrooms, and shower facilities.

Pros: An idyllic spot near Yellowstone National Park with affordable tipis along the river bank.

Cons: There are no private bathrooms in the tipis so you'll have to be okay with sharing bathrooms and shower facilities.

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Best Resorts sub banners Budget Friendly

Best Resorts sub banners Budget Friendly
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These glamping options are a step well above pitching your own tent and rolling out a sleeping bag. But they're still wallet-friendly options for your next outdoor escape, all coming in under $200 per night.

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