Prosecutors say this former Marine was one of 'the most violent' rioters who stormed the Capitol

Prosecutors say this former Marine was one of 'the most violent' rioters who stormed the Capitol
Pro-Trump supporters storm the US Capitol following a rally with President Donald Trump on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DCPhoto by Samuel Corum/Getty Images
  • US Marine Corps veteran Michael J. Foy was arrested on January 21 in connection with the Capitol riots on January 6.
  • Federal prosecutors wrote in a memo calling for pre-trial detention that he assaulted police officers with a hockey stick and a sharpened pole before rallying a mob to break into the Capitol through broken windows.
  • Foy's conduct was "some of the most violent that occurred at the riot on January 6," prosecutors said.

A former US Marine who was recently arrested in connection with the Capitol riots earlier this month stands accused of being among 'the most violent' individuals there.

Michael J. Foy was arrested on January 21 and charged with four felony offenses, including forcibly assaulting an officer of the United States.
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"The scene is chaotic, graphic, and brutal," federal prosecutors wrote in a memo in favor of pre-trial detention for Foy first reported by The Daily Beast.
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Prosecutors said that "rioters hurled projectiles at the officers and physically assaulted them, often using weapons like poles, bottles, and in Foy's case, a hockey stick."
Prosecutors say this former Marine was one of 'the most violent' rioters who stormed the Capitol
Foy allegedly striking police officers with a hockey stickUnited States District Court, Eastern District of Michigan, Southern Division

Prosecutors accused Foy of striking officers in the face, head, neck, and body no less than ten times. The violent beatings were allegedly preceded by Foy throwing a sharpened pole at police officers.

Prosecutors say this former Marine was one of 'the most violent' rioters who stormed the Capitol
Foy allegedly throwing a sharpened pole at Capitol Police officersUnited States District Court, Eastern District of Michigan, Southern Division
Foy's conduct was "some of the most violent that occurred at the riot on January 6," prosecutors said.
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"He, a former Marine trained in combat, brought a hockey stick to a riot at the Capitol, and when things started to get out of hand, he took a leading role in the violence," they wrote. "And then he rallied others into entering the Capitol-through broken windows."

Foy is a Marine veteran who served with the Corps for five years, Task & Purpose reported, citing his service record. Foy served as an engineer equipment mechanic. He trained for combat but he never deployed. "Michael Foy poses a demonstrated danger to the community and to himself if released on bond," prosecutors wrote, noting not only his participation in the riots but also his alleged substance abuse, mental health issues, and access to firearms.
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They said that Foy reported drinking as many as ten beers a day, including the day before he was arrested. He also had two long guns at home.

Returning to the riots, prosecutors said that "the severity of his conduct coupled with his current mental health issues make Foy a danger to the community and to himself."

A federal magistrate judge ordered Foy remain in detention until trial, The Daily Beast reported. Foy's court-appointed attorney told Insider that she had no comment on the pretrial detention memo or the ruling.
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Foy is one of more than two dozen former and current service members who have been charged with crimes in connection with the Capitol riots, NPR recently reported, revealing that roughly 1 in 5 people charged served in the military.

Among the people who stormed the Capitol earlier this month were several veterans from the Army, the Air Force, the Navy, and the Marine Corps, as well as current service members. One man who was arrested in connection with the riots at the Capitol is a member of the Virginia National Guard.

"These people are not representative of our country's military," Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley recently told The New York Times.
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A former Navy SEAL who was present at the Capitol that day said that he realized afterwards, once he started hearing that people had been killed, that "it was all taken too far."

"Now I regret being in the crowd," he told ABC News. "It accomplished nothing. What the hell was it all for?"

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