More than 100,000 people have died of COVID-19 in the US, which is comparable to the number of residents in a city like Edison, New Jersey

More than 100,000 people have died of COVID-19 in the US, which is comparable to the number of residents in a city like Edison, New Jersey
Healthcare workers wheel the body of deceased person from the Wyckoff Heights Medical Center during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in the Brooklyn borough of New York City, New York, U.S., April 2, 2020.REUTERS/Brendan Mcdermid
  • The US surpassed 100,000 deaths due to the novel coronavirus on Wednesday.
  • That's the equivalent of the entire population of Edison, New Jersey dying.
  • More than 4,000 US cities have a population of fewer than 100,000 people.

The death toll from the coronavirus in the US surpassed 100,000 on Wednesday. That's roughly the populations of Edison, New Jersey, (99,967, according to the 2010 US census) Kenosha, Wisconsin, (99,218, according to the 2010 US census), or even Flint, Michigan (102,434, according to the 2010 US census).

The US has 4,115 cities that have a population of fewer than 100,000 people.

In just three months, the death toll from COVID-19 is also more than the number of "US military combat fatalities in every conflict since the Korean War," The New York Times reported.
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The vast majority of these deaths took place in hotspots like New York, and have disproportionately impacted black and Hispanic communities.

According to The Washington Post, 14% of Americans said they knew someone who has died from the virus.

In some states, almost two-thirds of those who died were 80 years old or older, according to The Post. Nursing homes have been hard hit by the outbreak. Earlier this month, Business Insider reported that a third of all COVID-19 deaths happened in nursing homes.
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However even as the country surpassed 100,000 deaths, experts have long believed that official death counts are vastly undercounted.

The grim milestone comes not along after one Columbia University model showed that about 36,000 fewer people would have died if the United States had enacted social distancing measures sooner. Read the original article on Business Insider
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