Bosses beware, 3 in 4 millennials are after your job and think they do it better


  • The ‘Future of Workplace’ report published by workforce management company Kronos Incorporated has shown that three in every four millenials in India are confident that they are capable of doing their boss’ job — and better.
  • The surveyed employees were asked to rate their managers on a grades A,B,C, D and F and almost eight in every 10 employees responded that they are satisfied with their bosses.
  • India aside, working professionals in the UK, France and Germany are mostly unhappy with their managers.
Indian millennials believe that they can do their boss’ job, and do it better.

The ‘ Future of Workplace’ report published by workforce management company Kronos Incorporated shows that three in every four millenials in India are confident that they are capable of doing their boss’ job.

In fact, almost half (48%) of them feel that they can outperform their bosses.

"With the number of millennial managers growing, attitudes toward aspects of management and working style will also change. As the student becomes the teacher, organisations should have a clear lesson plan for leadership development and effectiveness in key areas to set tomorrow's managers up for ongoing success," said Joyce Maroney, Executive Director Workforce Institute, Kronos.

The surveyed employees were asked to rate their managers on a grades A,B,C, D and F in terms of work ethics and almost eight in every 10 employees responded that they are satisfied with their bosses.

Over a third of employees said that their managers can create a more blended environment, thereby enabling work-life balance. They can also communicate on the performance-related issues better.

On the flipside, the US and Canada are last on the ladder of confidence.

But, India aside, working professionals in the UK, France and Germany are mostly unhappy with their managers. The survey analysed responses from over 3,000 professionals across India, Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Mexico, the UK and the US.

See also:
Employees in this Indian city work longer than anyone else in the world: Report

Indians were asked what they would do in their free time if they could work for four days a week — and their answers are unexpected

Office politics and changing job roles are hurting employees the most, says a survey
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