There will be four lunar eclipses in 2020 - with the second one scheduled for June 5

There will be four lunar eclipses in 2020 - with the second one scheduled for June 5
Image of the partial lunar eclipse on August 9, 2017APOD/NASA

  • A penumbral lunar eclipse is schedule to take place on Friday, June 5.
  • This will be the second penumbral lunar eclipse or Chandra Grahan
  • Penumbral eclipses occur when the Sun, the Moon and the Earth are imperfectly aligned during a Full Moon.
Some cultures believe that a lunar eclipse or Chandra Grahan is when a demon swallows the Moon while others believe that it could be the road to salvation. This year, the Sun, the Moon and the Earth will imperfectly align on four different occasions — resulting in four separate penumbral lunar eclipses.

The second penumbral lunar eclipse of the year is scheduled to occur on Friday, June 5 followed by the annular solar eclipse on June 21 and another penumbral lunar eclipse on July 5.

Not all eclipses are the same

Advertisement
The Moon shines because the lunar surface reflects the Sun’s rays. When the Earth comes between the Moon and the Sun, the result is an eclipse.

Although not all eclipses are the same, they do have one thing in common — there has to be a full moon in the sky on the night of the event.

A total lunar eclipse is when Earth’s shadow — the umbra — completely covers the moon. It’s also commonly known as the ‘blood moon’.

Advertisement

A partial lunar eclipse is when only a small part of the Moon is covered by the Earth’s umbra — but three celestial bodies are still aligned in an almost straight line creating a dark shadow.

There will be four lunar eclipses in 2020 - with the second one scheduled for June 5
Different types of lunar eclipses depend on how the Earth's shadow falls on the MoonNASA

During penumbral lunar eclipses, on the other hand, the celestial bodies are aligned but not in a straight line. Since the penumbra — the outer part of Earth’s shadow — is fainter than the umbra, the lunar surface will only darken slightly.

The difference is so subtle that the naked eye might not be able to tell a penumbral eclipse from a normal full moon.
Advertisement

Also Read
Friday’s lunar eclipse might be difficult to spot — here’s how you catch the difference

Friday’s lunar eclipse might be difficult to spot — here’s how you catch the difference

This year, the Sun, the Moon and the Earth will imperfectly align on four different occasions — resulting in four separate penumbral lunar eclipses.

Here are the four lunar eclipses scheduled to take place in 2020:

{{}}
Friday’s lunar eclipse might be difficult to spot — here’s how you catch the difference

Friday’s lunar eclipse might be difficult to spot — here’s how you catch the difference

This year, the Sun, the Moon and the Earth will imperfectly align on four different occasions — resulting in four separate penumbral lunar eclipses.

The first lunar eclipse of 2020 will occur on January 10, 2020

The first lunar eclipse of 2020 will occur on January 10, 2020

The second lunar eclipse will take place on June 5, 2020

The second lunar eclipse will take place on June 5, 2020
Advertisement

A month later, the third lunar eclipse will occur on July 5, 2020

A month later, the third lunar eclipse will occur on July 5, 2020

The fourth and final lunar eclipse of the year will take place on November 30, 2020

The fourth and final lunar eclipse of the year will take place on November 30, 2020
Advertisement