Gamers are blaming 'overheating' Chromecast devices for games crashing on the new Stadia streaming service, but Google said the devices are 'working as intended'

Google Stadia w/ Chromecast UltraGoogle

  • Some Google Stadia users were blaming overheating Chromecast Ultra devices for Stadia crashing during extended gaming sessions, but that's not the case, according to Google.
  • A Google spokesperson said that overheating Chromecast Ultra devices are not to blame for crashing issues, and that while those devices may get hot, they are working as intended.
  • Google Stadia is the company's new game-streaming platform, where games run on Google's cloud-connected machines that wirelessly send visuals for those games to devices like the Chromecast Ultra. It works much like streaming a video.
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Some Stadia gamers using Google's Chromecast Ultra streaming device have blamed "overheating" devices for abrupt crashes encountered while using Stadia, but Google says that overheating devices aren't the issue.

One Stadia gamer on Reddit wrote that, "I was in the middle of a fight in Destiny 2 when suddenly my Chromecast died and lost connectivity to the network. I went to unplug it from the power and it was extremely hot."

Several others chimed in, reporting similar experiences. Some said they experienced crashing issues with the Chromecast Ultra and reported that their device had become hot to the touch, while others said they didn't experience any crashing despite their devices getting hot.

A Google spokesperson told Business Insider that thermal overheating on the Chromecast Ultra is not the cause of Stadia crashing mid-game, and that Chromecast Ultra streaming devices may get warm after normal usage, but they are working as intended. The spokesperson also said that Google conducted extensive testing on Stadia and its related hardware, and that it did not see thermal throttling issues.

No reasoning behind the crashes were offered, but the spokesperson said the company will work with users to better understand what's causing the issues.

Google released its Stadia game-streaming platform on November 19 to a tepid reception that mostly focused on the service's unimpressive games library. Stadia aims to allow gamers to play power-hungry, AAA video games - the kind that would typically run on powerful game consoles or computers - on any device that can stream a video. Essentially, you could play a demanding title like "Red Dead Redemption 2" on a smartphone or a cheap laptop, and since Google's service handles the heavy lifting, you don't have to worry about upgrading to a new game console.

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