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The DoJ is reportedly investigating if Tesla committed securities or wire fraud in Autopilot probe

Grace Kay   

The DoJ is reportedly investigating if Tesla committed securities or wire fraud in Autopilot probe
  • The Department of Justice is investigating potential securities or wire fraud by Tesla, Reuters reported.
  • The probe reportedly centers on Tesla's promotion of its driver assist software.

The Department of Justice is looking into potential securities or wire fraud connected with Tesla's efforts to promote its driver assist software, according to a report by Reuters that cited unnamed sources.

In 2022, the news agency first reported that the DoJ had launched a criminal probe into Tesla and its self-driving claims, but further details regarding the scope of the investigation were previously unknown.

The DoJ declined to comment, and Tesla did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

CEO Elon Musk has been promising for years that Tesla will put fully autonomous cars on the road and has repeatedly said the software will one day be able to perform better than a human driver.

The carmaker has faced scrutiny from a number of regulators over the years regarding its Autopilot and Full Self-Driving beta software.

In December, Tesla issued a recall via an over-the-air update to about two million vehicles after the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration found that Autopilot didn't have enough stop gaps to prevent drivers from misusing the software, following a two-year investigation into the feature.

On Tuesday, Reuters reported that the agency had asked Tesla for more detailed answers and documents related to the recall.

All current Tesla models come with the carmaker's Autopilot driver-assist program. Owners can also buy the company's Full Self-Driving beta feature for $8,000.

The beta feature enables the vehicle to automatically change lanes, enter and exit highways, recognize stop signs and traffic lights, and park. Both programs still require a licensed driver to monitor the system at all times.

Do you work for Tesla or have a tip? Reach out to the reporter via a non-work email and device at gkay@businessinsider.com



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